Pain Drug Reaches Phase 3 Clinical Trials | Dallas Legal Examiner | Dallas Texas Personal Injury Lawyer

Posted by Bryan Pope
June 7, 2016 8:55 AM

A Pittsburg-based drug development company has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for phase 3 clinical trials of a product to treat severe, persistent pain. The medication, T-121, is being developed by Thar Pharmaceuticals and is expected to enter the market by 2019. T-121 is an oral version of Novartis’ intravenous-only zoledronic acid, which is sold under the brand name Zometra. T-121 will be intended for patients suffering from complex regional pain syndrome/reflex sympathetic dystrophy (CRPS/RSD), a chronic pain condition often brought on by some sort of trauma. About 70,000 people across the U.S. experience pain from CRPS/RSD, which can become chronic over time and become a disabling condition.

Treatments for CRPS/RSD.

There are many different types of treatments for CRPS and new ones come about relatively frequently, although what works for one does not usually work for another, making treating the condition all the more difficult. Generally, the earlier CRPS is caught and treated correctly, the greater the chance that the condition will respond to medical treatment. Although most doctors agree that a combination of diet, exercise, physical therapy, and medication is the best treatment of CRPS for most patients, exactly what that combination may be and which medications work best is a highly debated issue among pain management doctors. There are no FDA-approved treatments for the pain of CRPS/RSD. Thar Pharmaceuticals developed the drug through the FDA’s orphan disease program, which allows for expedited review, tax credits and other competitive advantages for medications that help fewer than 200,000 people.

CRPS/RSD affects fewer than 200,000 patients in the U.S. each year, according to the National Organization for Rare Disorders.

Source: Pain Drug Reaches Phase 3 Clinical Trials | Dallas Legal Examiner | Dallas Texas Personal Injury Lawyer

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Creating a Better You | Barby Ingle

barbyingle.com

Barby Ingle barbyingle.com

I love it when people say, ‘you look so young’ and ‘I thought you were in your late twenties’. If a few people say it, it may just be a compliment, but for me, many say it. I believe age is an option. Yes, we gain a physical number on paper each year but when you look at your age, most think ‘how do I feel’. Age in this instance is a state of mind. I think people see me as younger than I am because I do look young on the outside, but I also have a playful personality. I know what I have lost, they don’t. Most in my life don’t know who I was, what I was capable of, how athletic I was. They know the person they see in front of them. I don’t drink, smoke or do drugs (that are not prescribed to me). So when people say, become a better you, what does that mean for those of us who are already trying to be the best we can be? For me it meant I wish someone would have told me about preparing for things that we may face or someone we love may face (chronic pain, disease, financial burdens, how to navigate the health system and life in general for that matter). I wish that I didn’t take life for granted when I was healthy. I had many experiences, most were great. I took them for granted until developing Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy which stopped me in my tracks.  I met my primary care provider (PCP) in 2005. When we met I was in a wheelchair, bathed about once every 7-10 days, and had dystonia in my right hand, arm and foot. I had cut off most of my hair to make it easier on me. I am sure I looked a mess. He never commented to me on how I looked. He worked to get me feeling better he became the first on my ‘team’. He didn’t know what I used to look like. He was shocked to find out that I was a former model, pageant queen, cheerleader, and athlete. After receiving infusion therapy in 2009, I went to see him. I went from wheelchair to walking with him as my main health provider. I changed my hair, I changed my clothes. Two things I could have done before feeling better, but I didn’t put the effort in on most days. When he saw the new me, he asked my husband how it feels to be with a woman who is getting younger. It’s not that I was getting younger, it is my state of mind improved. Our beliefs and behaviors must shift when we are living with a chronic pain disease, no matter what stage we are in. This shift determines how we feel about our life and health. Often times I would psych myself out. I would say to myself, I can’t do this, I can’t do that. I learned through trial and error what my boundaries are. I kept a journal to learn about myself and I found that my bounds were far past where I thought in my mind. I found that I needed to celebrate each moment, each day. When things got tough and I had to spend days/weeks/months in bed I didn’t need to get down on myself or put stress on myself for what I wasn’t doing. I kept a journal and a made a bucket list during those times. As time has passed, I found ways to accomplish those tasks and come up with new ones. I found that completing tasks is easier, quicker, and more accessible when I live through motivation of starting where I want to end up. Putting it in writing and organizing a plan of action (that is adjustable) is how I began to accomplish my goals. I found personal incentive by manifesting something on the outside first. I changed my hair. It was a simple enough start. It led me to buying a few new outfits. I created a goal of doing more life experiences instead of gathering stuff to sit around me. I started with 4 outfits that are my ‘experience outfits’, and then came up with activities where I could use the outfits. Starting small on the outside helps to manifest how I feel on inside. Keeping track of where I have been and where I want to be showed me that I am of worth. Eventually my mind and insides caught up to my outward feeling. Was I perfect? No. Was I out of chronic pain? No.  But, I did learn to count my miracles. An experience can’t be taken away from you unless you let it go. Let go of the negative and focus on the positive; in your mind, heart and outside. Keep working on yourself and start with a few goals. Give yourself ‘what to do’s’ instead of just opposing all of the positive things you could have in life. Even in pain you can find ways to get the end of each goal. To change you, YOU have to practice. Am I saying you can just change your pain away? No way, not at all. I am saying you have the ability in you to change how you face your challenges. Find ways to recognize, understand, and consolidate challenges to see the goals you have set come to be. Don’t worry about timelines. If it takes a healthy person 4 years to graduate college, don’t feel bad if it takes you ten. It is okay. Remember, a win is a win. You don’t lose until you give up. Strive to understand the overall gist of your decisions and don’t let setbacks, others’ negativity, others’ guilt beat out your decision. You have the right to be the best YOU possible; star

Source: Creating a Better You | Barby Ingle

In Memory of Mary LaBree – An Original RSD Advocate

One of our original RSDS Advocates, Mary LaBree, passed away on October 15, 2015 due to complications from Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD). Mary exemplified commitment to the RSD community for over 3 decades. As the Director of the New England RSDS Coalition since 1990, Mary sought to educate and bring awareness to the public and private sectors for the disease that was virtually unheard of back then. Originally from Leicester, Massachusetts, she was formally educated at Worcester State University in Worcester, Massachusetts.

 

 

Mary secured the JULY Proclamation for RSDS To urge all of the citizens of the Commonwealth to take cognizance of this event and participate fittingly in its observance. Given at the Executive Chamber in Boston, the twenty-fourth of June in the year two thousand and eleven, and of the Independence of the United States of America, the two hundred and thirty forth.” Massachusetts Bill # 5938

 

She worked both locally in Massachusetts and Nationally.

 

Mary formed and lead seminars, attended others, developed awareness events, distributed information and educational materials. She spoke with patients, caregivers, physicians, hospitals, insurance companies, fellow educators, universities, other peer groups, and those with an interest to learn about Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy. She was involved with grants, research and fundraising.

 

When Mary LaBree began advocating for RSD in the 1980’s the term Complex Regional Pain Syndrome hadn’t been created. While other names had been used previously to describe Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (Syndrome) it was most often referred to as RSDS.

 

In 2012, she reached out to me and a friendship formed. We shared phone calls, messages and correspondence by snail mail. Mary sent me a copy of the photo of she and other’s of the original signing of her proclamation and a copy of the verbiage used to secure her proclamations. I’m privileged to know what Mary looks like. For now, I’ll not share those, nor have I ever. She shared with me 30+ years of everything. How she started, how she educated, how other RSD organizations began, her children, grandchildren, colleagues, the strength it takes to endure; not just in living with pain, but being a part of it.

 

If you pray, why worry…  If you worry, why pray?  

 

I had plans to meet her in person twice. The first time she had to return home early. I was supposed to meet her again toward the end of October or into mid-November. I had just spoken to her less than a week before her passing.

 

  • October 8

10/8, 4:04pm

Mary LaBree

I was in the hospital yesterday, I had an accident with my wheelchair when I tried to back it up ( standing in front of it. ) (Stupid me )when I pushed the button to back it up.. I pushed it the wrong way..And ran over my LEDs from the ankles to the knees. I was really blessed when the ER Dr. Asked what other problems did I have, & when I explained CRPS He said oh Chronic Regional Pain Syndrome , I said yes. He treated me with kindness & care. I’m going to send him a thank you card. He was really kind. You don’t always find a kind caring Dr..pls pray for me to recover. I have a lot of CRPS work to do. I will be leaving for CA in a few weeks. Ty.M

  • October 9

10/9, 5:22pm

Twinkle Wood-VanFleet

You’re always in my thoughts and prayers for your health, and your work, Mary. I do hope to meet you in November. xx

  • October 10

10/10, 10:07pm

Mary LaBree

Hi, Yes I’m looking forward to meeting you as well. I leave Oct 23 on. Friday. A lil less then 2 wks.I will call u sometime on the weekend after I arrive, hugs & lots of love.M

  • October 12

10/12, 7:04pm

Mary LaBree

I’m sorry I had a mistake that I didn’t want to have a group pls forgive me, as I pressed the wrong thing, & didn’t realize it until someone told me.

 

The next message on Oct 12, I missed due to being away and my IM being flooded and then she was gone. I was on the road to and from the Stanford Transplant Clinic for our daughter on the 15th and in the Emergency Department on the 16th due to my cervical spine. Trying to save the puppies life all in between.

The last message was in reference to an accidental group IM.

I had been wondering if she would want to make the plans to meet at the NERVEmber, West Coast Pain Forum for Power of Pain Foundation on November 14th. All I knew for certain is she planned to be here in Northern California on the 23rd of October and would call me.

 

Mary LaBree Melanie McDowell Awareness and Advocacy Award Nomination 2015 Slide property of @powerofpain

Permission granted and sent from the Power of Pain Foundation to share in Mary’s memory. Melanie McDowell Awareness and Advocacy Award Nomination 2015

 

I wish she would have received more nominations, but mine was the only one for her.  She was most deserving.

 

We never know for certain where our conversations go even when we chit-chat on the phone or when we think they are in confidence. I don’t know what Mary ever spoke of me to others, but I know that she must have believed in me enough with what she did share with me to know I would keep it to me and if she didn’t know for sure when she told me she knew as time went on because I’ve never told it.

She asked me sometime in 2013 to consider being trained by her for her Coalition and new endeavors. While I was most honored, I respectfully declined as I was already committed to Power of Pain.

Our conversations also consisted of but weren’t limited to life, color, ethnicity, race, the olden days, differences, equality, change and today. She shared with me uncertainties about people, places and things, and I eased her in certain fear and prejudices. Please don’t misunderstand me, I’m not at all implying Mary was prejudice, in fact, she’s not, though conversations were simply sometimes deep. Mary listened and she learned. She watched, listened to gossip, dismissed it, listened more, read, picked it apart, put it together, and ultimately decided for herself. She wasn’t afraid to speak her mind or share a maybe, what if, what do you think or did you know.

 

I’m humbled to have been accepted, acknowledged, taught and even loved by her.

 

Mary was so proud of the New England RSDS Coalition, she was thrilled that the healthcare community was finally beginning to know what RSD (CRPS) is. She was pleased that patients had informational materials to seek out and be provided. She was happy that educational events were provided free to the public.

 

She told me the story behind July and why her proclamations are for the month of independence and not November. As I stated Mary began educating RSD over 30 years ago. July was chosen for freedom, freedom from pain. It wasn’t until many years later that a national color evolved, and then our month of recognition. Mary was grateful for her closest friends. I know she loved her beautiful friend, advocate and poet, Jane (Gonzales).

 

I prayed for her health and I prayed for her to achieve her life’s work, her mission to create awareness and educate on RSD, her purpose to continue doing so, and her hope for our future.

 

You did Mary! You really did! You achieved them all to the last breath.

 

And I thank you!

 

With gratitude, hugs and lots of love,

 

Miss you, won’t forget you,

~T

 

Mary’s Facebook page:    Pro image ML  https://www.facebook.com/messages/mlabree1

 

 

 

Lets not forget the ones who started the path that gave way for us to do what we do.  ~Twinkle V.

 

On behalf of all of us this one’s for you!

 

(Originally written at the end of October and updated today)

 


 

Reference to Mary’s favorite quote shared above. The above is shared the way she said it.

 

“If You Pray Don’t Worry… If You Worry Why Pray” sermon by Levi Wright

 

Making Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Simple For a Jury

MAKING COMPLEX REGIONAL PAIN SYNDROME SIMPLE FOR A JURY

A start-to-finish strategy for proving the chronic pain and resultant damages of CRPS

When God was testing the faith of Job, the worst punishment was physical pain…. He lost his lands and property, his family – but it was not until physical pain was inflicted that Job broke. (Job 16:6).

A case dealing with chronic pain can be difficult to prove due to the subjective nature of pain itself. This is especially true for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome cases (“CRPS”). CRPS, formerly known as Reflex Sympathetic Distrophy Syndrome (“RSD”), is an incurable chronic pain condition that is often debilitating. For trial lawyers and their clients, this disorder is especially troubling because of the controversy surrounding its diagnosis and treatment. As its very name implies, the disorder is “complex” in nature, is routinely misdiagnosed, and as such, is difficult to explain and prove to a jury.

Take a recent case that had a mixed diagnosis: Some doctors thought it was CRPS, while some did not. In the end, what mattered was our client had severe pain that would likely afflict him for the rest of his life. This was something the jury understood, whether we called it CRPS or not. The primary purpose of this article is to explain the basics of CRPS, highlight some of the challenges in dealing with a CRPS case, and discuss some useful strategies from a recent trial.

CRPS – WHAT IS IT?

CRPS is a chronic pain condition most often affecting one of the limbs (arms, legs, hands, or feet), in which the pain is out of proportion to thc injury. There are two designations of CRPS: Type I and II. Typc I, which this article will focus on, is a result of trauma. Type II stems from a specific injury to a nerve.

Some researchers have said CRPS is potentially the worst chronic pain disorder a human being could endure. Doctors describe the severe cases of CRPS as being higher on the pain scale than childbirth and amputation. However, over the years, pain management practitioners were overzealous in diagnosing chronic pain patients with CRPS. In the early 1990s, “RSD” cases were popping up everywhere, perhaps in part due to the unclear diagnostic criteria at the time. Now, after the hype has calmed and thorough research has flushed out a more clear understanding of the disorder, CRPS cases can and should command the same attention as other severe injuries such as brain and spinal cord injuries.

To begin with, CRPS arises typically after an injury or trauma to the affected limb. For example, a seemingly simple fracture to the ankle eventually causing a severe pain disorder in that limb. The most frightening aspect of the disease is that it often initially begins in an arm or a leg and often spreads throughout the body. In fact, according to the National Institute of Health, 92 percent of patients state that they have experienced a spread, and 35 percent of patients report symptoms in their whole body.

CRPS is characterized by prolonged or excessive pain and mild or dramatic changes in skin color, temperature, and/or swelling in the affected area. These signs can be subtle in nature, or dramatic, depending on the severity of the CRPS.

CRPS symptoms vary in severity and duration. The key symptom is prolonged pain that may be constant and, in some people, extremely uncomfortable or severe. The pain may feel like a burning or “pins and needles” sensation, or as if someone is squeezing the affected limb. The pain may spread to include the entire arm or leg, even though the precipitating injury might have been only to a finger or toe. Pain can sometimes even travel to the opposite extremity. There is often increased sensitivity in the affected area, such that even light touch or contact is painful (called allodynia).

People with CRPS also experience constant or intermittent changes in temperature, skin color, and swelling of the affected limb. An affected arm or leg may feel warmer or cooler compared to the opposite limb. The skin on the affected limb may change color, becoming blotchy, blue, purple, pale, or red. As discussed in more detail below, due to the complexity of the disorder, CRPS cases are often overlooked, misdiagnosed, and not properly worked up.

VETTING A CRPS CASE

As trial lawyers, we appreciate that many of our clients do not have the type of medical treatment and insurance required to get a complete medical workup and diagnosis. Often, an injury like a brain bleed or spinal fracture might go misdiagnosed. With a disorder such as CRPS, this is truly one of the injuries that often require an attorney’s eye and attention to appreciate the client’s dilemma.

The following are a few points to consider when interviewing a client to determine if he or she potentially has CRPS:

• An injury causing pain which is out of proportion to injury,

• Changes in skin texture on the affected area; it may appear shiny and thin,

• Abnormal sweating pattern in the affected area or surrounding areas,

• Changes in nail and hair growth patterns,

• Stiffness in affected joints,

• Problems coordinating muscle movement, with decreased ability to move the affected body part, and,

• Abnormal movement in the affected limb (most often fixed abnormal posture, or tremors of the affected limb).

For a full CRPS potential case checklist, please contact the author.

Find out more about:

What Causes CRPS?

CRPS Diagnosis and Prognosis

How to Deal with Conflicting CRPS Diagnoses

Voir Dire Tips in a Pain Trial

Experts: Get the Dream Team

Dealing with the Defense “Expert”

Making it Simple

via Making Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Simple For a Jury.

COMPLEX REGIONAL PAIN SYNDROME

THE RELENTLESS PURSUIT OF JUSTICE

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: The Relentless Pursuit of Justice

Causes

Symptoms

Diagnosis and Risk Factors

Prognosis and Treatment

Lawsuits and Damages

Spencer Lucas is a trial lawyer at Panish Shea & Boyle and specializes in complex catastrophic personal injury, products liability and wrongful death cases.  He has extensive experience in cases involving traumatic brain injuries, spinal cord injuries, and chronic pain.

Panish Shea & Boyle, LLP

11111 Santa Monica Blvd #700, Los Angeles, CA 90025

PHONE 877.800.1700

FAX 310.477.1699

Errors and Bullying in Chronic Pain Care

Oxy10Insurance is denying payment for opioid medication unless the patient agrees to attend a drug program. A California chronic pain patient with Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy told me of her experience. She wants others to be aware that this could happen to them. The patient was fortunate to be able to pay for her medication/  She said “Poor people are screwed! If I wouldn’t have had the money, I’d be without meds”. This seems to be a rising problem. The issue of prescription drug abuse is an important one and is being addressed. This patient has no history with abuse. It would be important to address this if she was a previous addict or if an issue developed during the course of treatment, but I find it disconcerting that she not be entitled to coverage unless she agrees. This brings me to another point. Will it be clearly noted in the record that the patient was not misusing or abusing prescription medication when referred to the program. It is important that it be made clear and precise because otherwise as the medical record follows her it could simply be said that a drug diversion or drug rehabilitation program was attended leading another doctor or pharmacist to the belief the person is an addict.

These are important questions and they cannot be ignored. There is a problem with file management that already exists. Previous medications aren’t removed from the record and for other patients that leave one State to find a Physician in another it appears they are still on narcotics they were no longer taking. With the development of the Controlled Substance Utilization Review and Evaluation System (CURES) and the California Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) healthcare providers who are eligible to prescribe controlled substances, pharmacists authorized to dispense, law enforcement, and regulatory boards are able to access patients controlled substance history.

These are tools that assist in learning information about a patient, but if information is not entered in correctly can also do harm. A little example, my husband was at his appointment recently and was asked if his medications had changed. This appointment was with his heart specialist. We had let the assistant know that his Gabapentin which he takes for Diabetic Neuropathy had been altered. She did right by asking but it didn’t make it into the record. An oversight. What if the medication was an analgesic opioid that was no longer being taken? Human error. No one would know it was no longer being taken. The assumption if a patient needed to be treated with a narcotic might be that they were drug seeking. Especially if other medications weren’t removed as well. Fortunately it wasn’t a major error. Unfortunately for someone else it could have been. Information still has to be entered accurately and people do make mistakes. Others simply don’t care enough to make sure it’s right.

Another example, an emergency room visit for an injury to the body. When the report was available it read, Alcohol Intoxication, as the reason for the visit. While the patient was intoxicated the only reason for the visit was to control bleeding, severe soft tissue damage requiring x-rays, and soft casting. While it should have been noted that the person was intoxicated it should not have been listed as the primary reason for the visit. This leads other physicians and emergency room personal who are only viewing the first part of the record to misconceptions which can adversely affect a patient in a new situation. They don’t have enough time in triage to look further, nor are most interested.

Learn the difdifferences between Electronic Medical Records, Electronic Health Records, and Personal Health Records

Patients need to become more assertive. Most of us feel that we are doing something wrong if we ask too many questions or if we demand a change. We have to take a more active role in our own care and lack thereof. We now have access to many of our own records for review in online patient centers. We can even communicate with our physicians.

If we don’t play an active role in our own care, records management and pain management, we will continue to be the scapegoat for other peoples errors. Lets review. A patient being required to enter a drug program in order to receive medication through her insurance. Another patient whose medication wasn’t updated and another whose reason for an emergency room visit wasn’t accurate.

There are hundreds of other stories that have been shared with me that just don’t add up. It all has more to do with the businesses involved than it does with any of us. For an insurance company to tell a patient they will only cover her medication if she completes a drug program, when she isn’t an addict, leads me to believe there is something in it for them, even if it’s to fulfill and obligation. An incentive. Patients are made to feel like they are abusers and addicts. This is wrong. For the small percentage that might be, it still wouldn’t be right to treat them poorly. These are the ones that would need help and to be assessed accordingly. I do know of legislation in the works that if a patient is on an opioid for 3 months or longer a drug program would be required to continue the medication.

Stay tuned,

~Twinkle V.

Power of Pain Foundation Co Sponsor Assembly Bill 623

california-sacramento-state-capitol-1Yesterday the Power of Pain Foundation Co-Sponsored AB 623 with Assembly Member Wood at the California State Capital in Sacramento where the bill was officially introduced.  I spoke on behalf of both pain patients and opioid abuse. In attendance with me and on behalf of POPF and the bill was Erik VanFleet, Kharisma VanFleet, Debbie Ellis, and Brandy Ellis.

Speaking at the event was: Assemblymember Wood (author), Assemblymember Levine, Mendocino County Sheriff Tom Allman,  Ralph A. Cansimbe, Chapter Commander PFC Alejandro R. Ruiz Chapter, American G.I. Forum, Representatives from bill sponsors US Pain Foundation, Power of Pain and American Chronic Pain Foundations and the CA Academy of Physician Assistants.

Legislation to Curb Prescription Drug Deaths UnveiledAB623_March242015_POPFCoSponsorWithAssemblymanWood

Published on Mar 26, 2015

(Sacramento) – California legislators, public health representatives and law enforcement officials announced new legislation at a State Capitol news conference to curb prescription drug abuse and deaths. Assembly Bill 623, authored by Assemblyman Jim Wood (D-Healdsburg), aims to reduce prescription drug abuse-related deaths by reducing their access to those most prone to abusing them. More than 60 people die every day in the United States from prescription drug overdoses. Approximately 6.5 million people in the US abused prescription drugs in 2013, more than double those that abused heroin, cocaine and hallucinogens combined. “Narcotic pain medications, or opioids, have an important role in our health care system,” said Assemblymember Wood, who is a licensed dentist. “They provide effective relief for the millions of Americans who suffer from chronic pain. But too easily they are getting into the wrong hands.” Here’s more in this Assembly Access video.http://www.asmdc.org/wood

Watch the Press Conference on Assembly Live

AB623_March242015_POPFCoSponsorWithAssemblymanWood_1

My speech-

Hello, My name is T. VanFleet, I am the Advocacy Director and Executive Board Member of the Power of Pain Foundation. I am also a pain patient myself. Through painful trial and error, my physicians and I have finally found the appropriate combination of medications to provide some relief from my debilitating symptoms. The prescription medications that I take allow me to do things that most people take for granted. Now, I celebrate small triumphs such as cooking, occasionally attending a function, and watching my grandson grow. One of the medications that helped give me my life back is a prescription opioid. A type of medication which has recently come under increased scrutiny due to heavy abuse by some.

Unfortunately, people who use prescription medications as intended can become unfortunate casualties of efforts to regulate opioid abuse, as we end up getting lumped in with those who misuse treatments. It is difficult to obtain refills,, denials and delays by pharmacists and insurance, including workers compensation leave patients in withdrawal and un-manageable circumstances including suicidal ideation.

Fortunately, there are new weapons available to help combat prescription opioid abuse which do not sacrifice the many patients who legitimately use the medications to fight pain. New “abuse deterrent formulations” (ADF) for opioids have properties that make it difficult or undesirable for someone to tamper with them. These medications are made with physical and chemical barriers, such as a special kind of coating or hardness to the pill itself, that won’t allow them to be chewed, crushed, cut, grated, ground up, or melted with water or alcohol.

The Power of Pain Foundation strongly believes that California policymakers must enact policies such as AB 623 to help develop a strong, lasting solution to the health crisis of prescription opioid abuse. We must find a balance that separates patients who truly need opioid medication to live productive lives and those who are abusing them. Responsible patients should not be punished in an attempt to crack down on prescription drug mis-use and abuse. Legislators, health care professionals and pharmaceutical companies must work together to stop opioid abuse while keeping the needs of chronic pain patients front-of-mind.

<end>

—-

I was honored to support this bill with Assemblyman Wood on behalf of the Power of Pain Foundation. It’s important that we assist in the prescription opioid drug abuse problem. This will help responsible pain patients get access to the care they need. Too many are denied now because of the stigma attached to their chronic pain identity. Abuse deterrent formulation’s will assist both issues.

AB623_March242015_POPFCoSponsorWithAssemblymanWood_2

Press Release Article Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Legislation to Curb Prescription Drug Deaths Unveiled by Assemblyman Jim Wood

For more information on the Power of Pain Foundation’s Policy Efforts, please visit-

Power of Pain Foundation | Policy Efforts | PatientAwareness.org

patient-awareness1-popf

-Friday March 20, 2014 Episode of

The Burning for a Cure show

With Hosts POPF President, Barby Ingle and POPF Executive Board Member & Marketing Director and Promotions Chairman – Joeygiggles and Co-Hosts Executive Board Member and Advocacy Chairwoman Twinkle VanFleet with Power of Pain Foundation Executive Director Ken Taylor.

Discussion: Legislation- Abuse Deterrent Formulation (ADF), more  Listen Here

Out in the real world, I try not to identify as a pain patient. We will be judged. You know it, and I know it. It becomes our label. As I attempt to go forward in advocacy it can sometimes be a little awkward. Not in my physical appearance, but In my inability to speak properly, delays, memory, forgetfulness, stuttering, wake-sleep, sleep-wake. I’m heading into my 15th year with CRPS type 2. My Neurocognitive deficit seemed a rapid decline. It’s part of the story that helps me fight to go on, for my family, for you.

You have to hang on to you! It’s okay to not be perfect. It’s okay to not be your “yesterday”.

The struggle is real. We are who we’ve become.  And it really is okay in all that it is. We might not like it, but we have to learn to accept it.

POPF-CoSponsor-AB623_BrandyEllis_DebbieEllis_TwinkleVanFleet_March242015PostPressConferenceCaliforniaStateCapital

Perfection is all that you can achieve in the here and the now. Getting that shower, getting dressed, combing our hair. Those are the triumphs.

There’s so much worth in the smallest things.

I believe in you! Believe in you, too.

Thank you Barby Ingle for always believing in me and my ability even when I didn’t.

POPF_AB623_KharismaVanFleet_BrandyEllis_DebbieEllis_TwinkleVanFleet_March242015
Lets try to remember to not pre-judge a chronic pain patient on appearance or preconceived notions, but instead, assess on diagnosis, and credibility. ~Twinkle V.

Spinal Modulation Completes Enrollment of Its Landmark U.S. Pivotal Trial Evaluating the Axium Neurostimulator System for Chronic Pain | Business Wire

The ACCURATE study enrolled 152 patients at 22 centers throughout the United States. This represents the largest neuromodulation study to be conducted in patients suffering from nerve injuries (peripheral causalgia) or complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS, also known as RSD) to date.

“Approximately 10-50% of patients who undergo common procedures like hernia repair, knee surgery, and other lower limb surgeries will suffer from chronic pain resulting from nerve injury2. These conditions have historically been difficult to treat with currently available technology,” said Dr. Timothy Deer, co-study lead and CEO and President of the Center for Pain Relief in Charleston, West Virginia. “The ACCURATE trial is a landmark study that could change the way we treat these chronic pain conditions. Results from prior European studies have been promising, and we are hopeful that the ACCURATE trial will continue to substantiate the effectiveness of this therapy for our patients.”

Read more-

via Spinal Modulation Completes Enrollment of Its Landmark U.S. Pivotal Trial Evaluating the Axium Neurostimulator System for Chronic Pain | Business Wire.