Triple Wide Down

Consider this a mix of humor, seriousness and heart.

Okay, so my butt has been a total breaking down triple wide since I was in my early 30’s and after CRPS. For those of you who need some visual that means my health related issues gifted me a triple wide ass and one that I should have never accepted. Deteriorating as a result of everything I didn’t do for it! You know like “I gotta big butt and I cannot lie?” I’m thrilled to report that it’s a double wide now.  😛

Goals

Make my double wide even better. (I’ll show you when my mood tells me to. Lol)

Try not to build so much muscle that people who try to do me dirty don’t become my bitch! (Word porn: Perception and interpretation. I’ll never tell)

Try not to do things with the shake weight that other people find offending. (Focus on the ones who love it. :))

serenity-prayer

Stronger Than Pain

 

 

 

 

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Mid Metatarsal Separation | Lis Franc Separation

 

“Lisfranc joint injuries are rare, complex and often misdiagnosed. Typical signs and symptoms include pain, swelling and the inability to bear weight. Clinically, these injuries vary from mild sprains to fracture-dislocations. On physical examination, swelling is found primarily over the midfoot region. Pain is elicited with palpation along the tarsometatarsal articulations, and force applied to this area may elicit medial or lateral pain. Radiographs showing diastasis of the normal architecture confirm the presence of a severe sprain and possible dislocation. Negative standard and weight-bearing radiographs do not rule out a mild (grade I) or moderate (grade II) sprain. Reevaluation may be necessary if pain and swelling continue for 10 days after the injury. Proper treatment of a mild to moderate Lisfranc injury improves the chance of successful healing and reduces the likelihood of complications. Patients with fractures and fracture-dislocations should be referred for surgical management.

The Lisfranc joint, or tarsometatarsal articulation of the foot, is named for Jacques Lisfranc (1790–1847), a field surgeon in Napoleon’s army. Lisfranc described an amputation performed through this joint because of gangrene that developed after an injury incurred when a soldier fell off a horse with his foot caught in the stirrup.1,2 The incidence of Lisfranc joint fracture–dislocations is one case per 55,000 persons each year.2,3 Thus, these injuries account for fewer than 1 percent of all fractures.2,3 As many as 20 percent of Lisfranc joint injuries are missed on initial anteroposterior and oblique radiographs.2–4

Lisfranc joint fracture–dislocations and sprains can be caused by high-energy forces in motor vehicle crashes, industrial accidents and falls from high places.1–3 Occasionally, these injuries result from a less stressful mechanism, such as a twisting fall. Since Lisfranc joint fracture–dislocations and sprains carry a high risk of chronic secondary disability,2 physicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for these injuries in patients with foot injuries characterized by marked swelling, tarsometatarsal joint tenderness and the inability to bear weight.” Lisfranc Injury of the Foot: A Commonly Missed Diagnosis (Para 1, 2, 3) http://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0701/p118.html

CRPSRSD Awareness Twinkle V. @rsdcrpsfire - R Foot Nov 10, 15_1

Twinkle V. CRPS 2 November 10, 2015 DOI 1/26/2001

From misdiagnosed to a hell ride I’m still on, I’ve managed to find a glimpse of heaven in it all because I do work with me so that I’m not a total disappointment on myself or society. A bit over a week ago I was banned from Facebook. I had to provide documentation of proof of identity to return. I could have declined, but I was in a tight spot having a group there. Facebook’s policy is that everyone is to use the name they are known as offline, on Facebook, so that others know who they are. Sure we might say well if I’m known as this or that I should be able to use this or that. I hope people stay off me now. I’m me and I’m tired of having to prove it. We all know how many incognito accounts are on there. How many fake names, symbolism. People who have more than 3 accounts of various sorts. I have one account, I’ve never had another. Ever! I’ve always used my name. Once I was blocked, I had to verify me before being allowed full account privileges again. I was temporarily granted access back once I sent the document.

I’m Twinkle, I’m verified, (and proven myself yet again) and I hope that now that I have, who ever reported me, and each of you who want to refer to me as something different will either leave me be or respect that I haven’t ask you the same, or violated your privacy, or attempted to humiliate you, but instead realize that your actions have impacts.

Perhaps I should ask for your identification online and in person.

Between the diagnosis’ obstacles, I still manage to put in a few hours a month volunteering because it’s important that we find consistent tasks and daily agendas. When I’m not doing those things, I’m inclined to spend time in creative arts, things that have nothing to do with chats, Facebook, or social media until which time I might either post to share or keep to myself for another day. I love music and words and I love pieces and parts of all of it. I know the time is coming I won’t be able to stay up on my own anymore. Doze off all day long because you have the excessive daytime sleepiness and narcoleptic episodes, but you don’t sleep at night because you have the complex apnea, your brain doesn’t even send the signal for you to breathe, and your machine forces you to breathe all night long. None of which counts the numerous times you wake too because your spine has deteriorated, your legs are CRPS crazy, your arms fail you, and you just want to get comfortable. You have at least 10 + other diagnosis (internal and organ) and refuse to be beaten!

Each time the foot reaches the ground, pain isn’t just pain, you’re immediately in your head (coping), no reason to whine or complain. It certainly isn’t a reason to want to use pain medication, but it’s the very reason I know pain, understand it, and feel it for others beyond what I knew prior. It’s the very reason I do what I do. Remove the survival, you remove the very reason for living. Only so much can be done solo.

So when I say I did that first near 9 months of intense PT just to have “learned” to walk again? Truth! When I say I push through it each day? Truth! When I say intractable, forever? Truth! The Lis Franc screw remained for 6 months before removal and rehabilitation. My journey hadn’t even started yet at that point. Even in the still, you have to use your mind to bring it down. Every day is ongoing physical rehabilitation with cognitive assists.

The only chance I had was the one I gave myself.

I think I’m doing pretty darned good for doing so darned bad.

 

Mid Metatarsal Separation/Lis Franc Separation

http://orthopedics.about.com/cs/footproblems/a/lisfranc.htm

Lisfranc Injury of the Foot: A Commonly Missed Diagnosis

http://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0701/p118.html

Lisfranc Injuries

http://www.foothealthfacts.org/footankleinfo/lisfranc_injuries.htm

Treating Pain That Won’t Go Away – Ithaca Times : Family And Health

Posted: Thursday, December 4, 2014 12:03 pm

By Bill Chaisson

“There are two types of CRPS. Type 1, which accounts for 90 percent of documented cases, according to the Mayo Clinic, is marked by nerve pain when no nerve damage was involved in the initial injury. Type 2 is a more explicable development of regional pain after damage to the nerves.”

Read more-

via Treating Pain That Won’t Go Away – Ithaca Times : Family And Health.

RSD/CRPS Poetry Contest

036-letter-writing-correspondence 

RSD/CRPS Poetry Contest

Tell us your thoughts on this monster’s effects on you, to be shared in the month of November for awareness.

Rhyming or non, doesn’t matter. All that matters is getting the word out that this disorder is complex and debilitating, that it’s affect reaches far beyond the patient, to family and friends.

And tell the flip side, the friends you’ve made, new skills you’ve learned, gratitude gained.

What’s your story?

Send your unpublished poem(s) to mgonzales182@comcast.net .

The prize for the winning poem (1st place) will be a $25.00 donation to American RSD Hope in your name.

 

Submission deadline is Wednesday, October 22, 2014

FAQ: Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy | The Dr. Oz Show

FAQ: Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy | The Dr. Oz Show.

 

Philip Getson, D.O. • Yesterday (July 25, 2013) “I was given the honor of having a post on RSD featured on droz.com Please feel free to comment on it” 
“I am delighted to get the disease the exposure it so deserves”. “Here is the link for the RSD post” These above are the personal words of Dr. Getson, I have quoted. 
http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/faq-reflex-sympathetic-dystrophy

 

I am delighted that Q & A’s regarding CRPS/RSD (Complex Regional Pain Syndrome/Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy) made it back to Dr. Oz. via Dr. Getson.

In addition, the differences between CRPS/RSD and Fibromyalgia were touched on.

Paula Abdul tried to do her part in sharing the debilitating outcome this illness causes, but as some of us know television editing can leave a lot out.

Even so I think Paula made her point. There were some people that tried to convince me of how terrible she did, I re watched that segment I can’t tell you how many times and the bottom line is she did great! How much can you do in so little time. It wasn’t an RSD specific show in the first place it was to showcase a vitamin line of healthier living. So yep, good job for what she had to work with.

For Dr. Philip Getson who has been educating and treating CRPS/RSD for decades, I am honored to have spoken to him briefly via email and look forward to again. I also look forward to the P.A.I.N. SUMMIT hosted by the Power of Pain Foundation during Pain Awareness month where he will be Guest Lecturing. I would love to meet him in person and attend the conference in Arizona but if not, I will still be attending via UStream and have already registered.

 

~Twinkle V.

RSD Patient Seeks Community Support

In a telephone interview yesterday May 14, 2013 a Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy patient stated she has temporarily lost custody of her 16 year old son to Department of Services for Children, Youth and Their Families (DSCYF) and they are trying to remove her 9 year old daughter. The patient from Delaware shared that the vibrations and sensitivity to her hearing has been documented by her doctor and that children services believes she has a mental disorder.  Apparently a case worker for the State did a search for CRPS/RSD and found an article which included “Emotional Disturbance” as part of the condition and is using this against her.

Let me try to be more specific while CRPS/RSD can cause a number of secondary symptoms it absolutely does not mean everyone will have them. Unless your doctor has diagnosed you with a mental disorder I do not think this type of state worker is qualified to do so this way. And certainly not by Google search.

Jim Moret, Host of Inside Edition, Attorney and Author of The Last Day of My Life describes his own journey with his son’s CRPS diagnosis in When Pain Becomes the New Normal. 

Many of us already face the stigma involved with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome formerly known as Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy first discovered during the civil war by Silas Weir Mitchell. It is not a mental disease or disorder. It is a physical condition which begins with physical characteristics and symptoms.  www.powerofpain.org  www.rsds.org

Because this illness is so misunderstood and because there are still so many that are uneducated regarding it’s existence patients face anything from “but you don’t look sick” to “you must be a drug seeker”.  This disease does not discriminate! Even children can develop it.

A very high percentage of us, I don’t have the exact statistics, yet I’d guess it to be in the high 90 percentile were active members of society, we worked, raised children, were active in our lives, if single parents raised children alone, some of us had everything, others like myself had enough to just be happy.

Now let me ask you this…

Why would we give all that up for this?

I admit I worry about the single mothers out there with CRPS/RSD who lack family support.  Especially when the family does not believe in the illness and when the patient is on disability and the family thinks the patient should be working. Again no education and understanding.

Many don’t even want to know. Do you know how many times I have listened to patients tell me how they tried to reach out to their families, spouses, children with educational material, videos etc, just to learn those people were not interested?

To me it’s no different than learning about Parkinson’s, Heart Disease, Diabetes or any other illness. Would you be interested in that?

This is why ongoing awareness for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome/Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy is so very important and why the power of community is just as important.

There are many disabled parents out there in the world caring for their children.

Each CRPS/RSD patient should be treated on a case by case basis, we should not all be clumped together, one size does not fit all, but the diagnosis is the same.

Autumn asks for your help. She asks that anyone who can come forward to write a letter on her behalf, make a phone call or support her in any way to email her at: Autumn Stevens

~Twinkle VanFleet

CRPS/RSD and Suicide

Over the years we have heard that suicides for CRPS/RSD (Complex Regional Pain Syndrome/Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy) patients is the highest of all suicide rates.

This may not be as necessarily true as it seemed. This also does not entirely mean it’s false.

The following is an excerpt by the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome Association (RSDSA) –

Suicide and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS)
On June 23, 2012, Jill Harkany-Friedman, PhD, spoke to the RSDSA Board of Directors and invited guests on the topic of CRPS and Suicide Prevention. Dr. Harkany-Friedman is the Senior Director of Research and Prevention for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP). RSDSA asked Dr. Harkany-Friedman to speak because of recent suicides in the CRPS community. She assured us that although most individuals have fleeting thoughts of ending one’s life, suicide is relatively rare (12 out of 100,000). Furthermore, 90% of those who die by suicide have a diagnosable mental disorder, i.e. depression, anxiety, alcohol or substance abuse, and a potentially treatable mental disorder. We are posting her PowerPoint® presentation for your information.

I respectfully give all credit to the RSDSA for the above information.

While I respect the educated view of Dr. Harkany-Friedman the thought presents itself that she seems to be stating that nearly all those CRPS related suicides indeed had and underlying mental disorder therefore was the reason they took their own lives. I am not certain though. The estimates were on an over all amount of suicide percentages rather than CRPS specific.

I do apologize in advance for any misunderstandings.

I have rarely ever used offensive language in my posts, but in order for the general masses to understand what I mean in a blunt manner, I will come right out and say it, “Chronic severe pain is a mind and head fuck”. It becomes mental. We all know, at least most of us do, in order for us to feel pain, our brain has to feel it first.

That’s why coping strategies, meditation, relaxation, bio feedback, breathing exercises, guided imagery, aroma therapy and so many other techniques are necessary tools for the management of pain.

I have a hard time believing each of the CRPS suicides also had a mental disorder. Of course we’re mental. That doesn’t mean we have a mental disease, also.

It’s not all in our heads it’s in our bodies!

This also bring up another thought and that is if those suicides were CRPS misdiagnosis’. I hate to bring this up but there are some people who desire to be sick, who seek attention, who thrive on pity, who watch and listen to others for their symptoms so they can take what they learn to their own doctors and claim the same illness. Those people would have mental disorders.

In these cases I would hope the doctor’s were watching the objective findings rather than only listening to the subjective.

A little example,

30 people on a plane

Someone starts coughing and gagging suddenly, itching themselves all over. Making a scene for all to notice.

The person gets out of his seat and stumbles into another passengers and coughs all over him.

That person begins to worry he is catching something. He starts to itch himself.

Suddenly others are doing the same.

Next thing you know every one is hacking, coughing, itching and going nuts.

They all think they’ve contracted some illness, epidemic..

The problem is no one has it’s all in their heads. They only believe it to be true.

The first person never had anything at all. It was just a test.

This only goes to show the power of suggestion.

For some reason I tend to think that if deaths were related to CRPS/RSD we wouldn’t know that it was. Somehow some way it would be found and reported that that there was a psychiatric condition present or un diagnosed and that was the reason behind the suicide. Since nearly all CRPS/RSD patients have been diagnosed with depression secondary their illness, I have a feeling the depression would be used as the cause and not the horrible pain itself.

Suicidal ideations would be almost natural for anyone going through a painful hardship. The mind tries to free itself from ongoing pain and turmoil. It may plan and think of ways out, do things it wouldn’t normally do when more at ease, may even harm, cause bodily injury and so much more.

Self harming, cutting and causing bodily injury isn’t always a sign of suicide or suicidal ideations, sometimes it’s just a diversion to the original pain one is constantly feeling.

I think most CRPS/RSD’rs who have suicidal thoughts don’t really want to die at all, on the contrary they want to live.

They just need help managing their pain and most of them aren’t getting it.

~Twinkle Wood-VanFleet