Mid Metatarsal Separation | Lis Franc Separation

 

“Lisfranc joint injuries are rare, complex and often misdiagnosed. Typical signs and symptoms include pain, swelling and the inability to bear weight. Clinically, these injuries vary from mild sprains to fracture-dislocations. On physical examination, swelling is found primarily over the midfoot region. Pain is elicited with palpation along the tarsometatarsal articulations, and force applied to this area may elicit medial or lateral pain. Radiographs showing diastasis of the normal architecture confirm the presence of a severe sprain and possible dislocation. Negative standard and weight-bearing radiographs do not rule out a mild (grade I) or moderate (grade II) sprain. Reevaluation may be necessary if pain and swelling continue for 10 days after the injury. Proper treatment of a mild to moderate Lisfranc injury improves the chance of successful healing and reduces the likelihood of complications. Patients with fractures and fracture-dislocations should be referred for surgical management.

The Lisfranc joint, or tarsometatarsal articulation of the foot, is named for Jacques Lisfranc (1790–1847), a field surgeon in Napoleon’s army. Lisfranc described an amputation performed through this joint because of gangrene that developed after an injury incurred when a soldier fell off a horse with his foot caught in the stirrup.1,2 The incidence of Lisfranc joint fracture–dislocations is one case per 55,000 persons each year.2,3 Thus, these injuries account for fewer than 1 percent of all fractures.2,3 As many as 20 percent of Lisfranc joint injuries are missed on initial anteroposterior and oblique radiographs.2–4

Lisfranc joint fracture–dislocations and sprains can be caused by high-energy forces in motor vehicle crashes, industrial accidents and falls from high places.1–3 Occasionally, these injuries result from a less stressful mechanism, such as a twisting fall. Since Lisfranc joint fracture–dislocations and sprains carry a high risk of chronic secondary disability,2 physicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for these injuries in patients with foot injuries characterized by marked swelling, tarsometatarsal joint tenderness and the inability to bear weight.” Lisfranc Injury of the Foot: A Commonly Missed Diagnosis (Para 1, 2, 3) http://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0701/p118.html

CRPSRSD Awareness Twinkle V. @rsdcrpsfire - R Foot Nov 10, 15_1

Twinkle V. CRPS 2 November 10, 2015 DOI 1/26/2001

From misdiagnosed to a hell ride I’m still on, I’ve managed to find a glimpse of heaven in it all because I do work with me so that I’m not a total disappointment on myself or society. A bit over a week ago I was banned from Facebook. I had to provide documentation of proof of identity to return. I could have declined, but I was in a tight spot having a group there. Facebook’s policy is that everyone is to use the name they are known as offline, on Facebook, so that others know who they are. Sure we might say well if I’m known as this or that I should be able to use this or that. I hope people stay off me now. I’m me and I’m tired of having to prove it. We all know how many incognito accounts are on there. How many fake names, symbolism. People who have more than 3 accounts of various sorts. I have one account, I’ve never had another. Ever! I’ve always used my name. Once I was blocked, I had to verify me before being allowed full account privileges again. I was temporarily granted access back once I sent the document.

I’m Twinkle, I’m verified, (and proven myself yet again) and I hope that now that I have, who ever reported me, and each of you who want to refer to me as something different will either leave me be or respect that I haven’t ask you the same, or violated your privacy, or attempted to humiliate you, but instead realize that your actions have impacts.

Perhaps I should ask for your identification online and in person.

Between the diagnosis’ obstacles, I still manage to put in a few hours a month volunteering because it’s important that we find consistent tasks and daily agendas. When I’m not doing those things, I’m inclined to spend time in creative arts, things that have nothing to do with chats, Facebook, or social media until which time I might either post to share or keep to myself for another day. I love music and words and I love pieces and parts of all of it. I know the time is coming I won’t be able to stay up on my own anymore. Doze off all day long because you have the excessive daytime sleepiness and narcoleptic episodes, but you don’t sleep at night because you have the complex apnea, your brain doesn’t even send the signal for you to breathe, and your machine forces you to breathe all night long. None of which counts the numerous times you wake too because your spine has deteriorated, your legs are CRPS crazy, your arms fail you, and you just want to get comfortable. You have at least 10 + other diagnosis (internal and organ) and refuse to be beaten!

Each time the foot reaches the ground, pain isn’t just pain, you’re immediately in your head (coping), no reason to whine or complain. It certainly isn’t a reason to want to use pain medication, but it’s the very reason I know pain, understand it, and feel it for others beyond what I knew prior. It’s the very reason I do what I do. Remove the survival, you remove the very reason for living. Only so much can be done solo.

So when I say I did that first near 9 months of intense PT just to have “learned” to walk again? Truth! When I say I push through it each day? Truth! When I say intractable, forever? Truth! The Lis Franc screw remained for 6 months before removal and rehabilitation. My journey hadn’t even started yet at that point. Even in the still, you have to use your mind to bring it down. Every day is ongoing physical rehabilitation with cognitive assists.

The only chance I had was the one I gave myself.

I think I’m doing pretty darned good for doing so darned bad.

 

Mid Metatarsal Separation/Lis Franc Separation

http://orthopedics.about.com/cs/footproblems/a/lisfranc.htm

Lisfranc Injury of the Foot: A Commonly Missed Diagnosis

http://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0701/p118.html

Lisfranc Injuries

http://www.foothealthfacts.org/footankleinfo/lisfranc_injuries.htm

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Mid Metatarsal Separation | Lis Franc Separation

  1. Pingback: Review | Gohl Program | Part 1 | RSD Advisory- Where Chronic Pain & Depression Collide

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s