Review: August and September 2016. California Advocacy Day (NPAF | CCCC) Music Moves Awareness (iPain)

On August 1st and 2nd, I was honored to have been invited to attend the California Advocacy Day, debriefing and meetings with Senators and/or their staff at the California State Capital via the National Patient Advocate Foundation (NPAF) and the California Chronic Care Coalition. Attending as the Advocacy Director of the International Pain Foundation and NPAF patient advocate, I had the privilege of meeting many new people including Liz Helm, and be in the presence of others I’ve crossed paths with at the Capital over the years.

caadvocacyday-aug-2-16-npaf-cccc-ipain-castatecapital

For the last 2 years the International Pain Foundation has been working on a multifaceted project. Music Moves Awareness premiered on September 1, 2016 in Los Angeles, California. Releasing their Debut song Hope is True, iPain moved to inspire everyone with an an upbeat, inspirational dance  tune that can get patients moving simply by it’s enthusiastic beats.

The 12 Steps to Patient Empowerment was developed with each contributing writer not knowing what they were writing about. The most amazing challenge to create without secondary knowledge and the best outcome that might be hoped for. https://powerofpain.org/ipain-living-magazine/

Copies are available for your business, offices, health establishments. Please contact: media@internationalpain.org or contact me directly at: twinkle@internationalpain.org

Meet the iPain Featurettes https://powerofpain.org/ipain-featurettes/ 

Nominated and awarded the Melanie McDowell Awareness and Advocacy Award – Hero of hope 2016. Smiles for miles.

twinkle-vanfleet-receiving-ipain-heroofhope-award-from-barby-ingle-musicmovesawareness-september-1-2016-los-angeles-ca-in-los-angeles-california

https://powerofpain.org/heroes-of-hope/

with-mr-dominick-spatafora-president-neuropathy-action-foundation-naf-musicmovesawareness

This year was an accumulation of heartache and hope.

twinkle-vanfleet-liveongiveon-ipain-recognition

the-morning-after-mma-premiere-party-gayle-twinkle-and-barby-september-2-2016

The morning after Music Moves Awareness debut in Los Angeles California. Gayle M. Taylor-Ford, iPain Board of Directors and author of Step 10 – Pain Management, Twinkle VanFleet, Advocacy Director,  Melanie McDowell Hero of Hope recipient, iPain, and Barby Ingle, President International Pain Foundation and author of Step 1 – Empower! and co author of Step 3 Discussion – with Sara Hobbs. internationalpain.org

I’m thrilled to be the author of Step 2- Responsibility. 12 Steps to Patient Empowerment and feature- Stronger Than Pain in the current addition of iPain Living Magazine.

Godspeed.

CA [R] SB 1160 – Workers Compensation

Commentary- It’s important to establish responsibility for not only the injured worker which seems to be set forth much more clearly, but also for those who control the injured workers life in care, ongoing care, and quality of life. This must include employers, insurance adjusters, attorney’s and those who set back the process of diagnosis, healing, and access to proper and timely care for these injured workers without delay, denials, or stall tactics.

Number: CA [R] SB 1160 – Workers Compensation
Updated (Status 09/10/2016) Sponsor: Sen. Tony Mendoza (DEM-CA)
Introduced by Senator Mendoza
(Principal coauthor: Senator Pan)

ca-state-capital-photo-by-twinklev

February 18, 2016

An act to amend Sections 138.4, 138.6, 4610.5, 4610.6, 4903.05, 4903.8, 5307.27, 5710, 5811, and 6409 of, to amend, repeal, and add Section 4610 of, and to add Section 4615 to, the Labor Code, relating to workers’ compensation.

According to the Legislative Counsil Digest existing law establishes a workers’ compensation system, administered by the Administrative Director of the Division of Workers’ Compensation, to compensate an employee for injuries sustained in the course of his or her employment.
Existing law requires the administrative director to develop and make available informational material written in plain language that describes the overall workers’ compensation claims process, as specified.
This bill would require the administrative director to adopt regulations to provide employees with notice regarding access to medical treatment following the denial of a claim under the workers’ compensation system.
Existing law requires the Administrative Director of the Division of Workers’ Compensation of the Department of Industrial Relations to develop a workers’ compensation information system in consultation with the Insurance Commissioner and the Workers’ Compensation Insurance Rating Bureau, with certain data to be collected electronically and to be compatible with the Electronic Data Interchange System of the International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions. Existing law requires the administrative director to assess an administrative penalty of not more than $5,000 in a single year against a claims administrator for a violation of those data reporting requirements.
This bill would increase that penalty assessment to not more than $10,000. The bill would require the administrative director to post on the Division of Workers’ Compensation Internet Web site a list of claims administrators who are in violation of the data reporting requirements.
Existing law requires every employer to establish a utilization review process, and defines “utilization review” as utilization review or utilization management functions that prospectively, retrospectively, or concurrently review and approve, modify, delay, or deny, based in whole or in part on medical necessity to cure and relieve, treatment recommendations by physicians, prior to, retrospectively, or concurrent with providing medical treatment services. Existing law also provides for an independent medical review process to resolve disputes over utilization review decisions, as defined.
This bill would revise and recast provisions relating to utilization review, as specified, with regard to injuries occurring on or after January 1, 2018. Among other things, the bill would set forth the medical treatment services that would be subject to prospective utilization review under these provisions, as provided. The bill would authorize retrospective utilization review for treatment provided under these provisions under limited circumstances, as specified. The bill would establish procedures for prospective and retrospective utilization reviews and set forth provisions for removal of a physician or provider under designated circumstances. On and after January 1, 2018, the bill would establish new procedures for reviewing determinations regarding the medical necessity of medication prescribed pursuant to the drug formulary adopted by the administrative director, as provided. The bill would make conforming changes to related provisions to implement these changes.

The bill would, commencing July 1, 2018, require each utilization review process to be accredited by an independent, nonprofit organization to certify that the utilization review process meets specified criteria, including, but not limited to, timeliness in issuing a utilization review decision, the scope of medical material used in issuing a utilization review decision, and requiring a policy preventing financial incentives to doctors and other providers based on the utilization review decision. The bill would require the administrative director to adopt rules to implement the selection of an independent, nonprofit organization for accreditation purposes, as specified. The bill would authorize the administrative director to adopt rules to require additional specific criteria for measuring the quality of a utilization review process for purposes of accreditation and provide for certain exemptions. The bill would require the administrative director to develop a system for electronic reporting of documents related to utilization review performed by each employer, to be administered by the division. The bill would require the administrative director, on or after March 1, 2019, to contract with an outside independent research organization to evaluate and report on the impact of provision of medical treatment within the first 30 days after a claim is filed, for claims filed on or after January 1, 2017, to January 1, 2019. The bill would require the report to be completed before January 1, 2020, and to be distributed to the administrative director, the Senate Committee on Labor and Industrial Relations, and the Assembly Committee on Insurance.
Existing law requires every lien claimant to file its lien with the appeals board in writing upon a form approved by the appeals board. Existing law requires a lien to be accompanied by a full statement or itemized voucher supporting the lien and justifying the right to reimbursement, as specified.
This bill would require certain lien claimants that file a lien under these provisions to do so by filing a declaration, under penalty of perjury, that includes specified information. The bill would require current lien claimants to also file the declaration by a specified date. The bill would make a failure to file a declaration under these provisions grounds for dismissal of a lien. Because the bill would expand the crime of perjury, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
The bill would also automatically stay any physician or provider lien upon the filing of criminal charges against that person or entity for specified offenses involving medical fraud, as provided. The bill would authorize the administrative director to adopt regulations to implement that provision. The bill would state findings and declarations of the Legislature in connection with these provisions.
Existing law prohibits the assignment of a lien under these provisions, except under limited circumstances, as specified.
This bill would, for liens filed after January 1, 2017, invalidate any assignment of a lien made in violation of these provisions, by operation of law.
Existing law requires the administrative director, in consultation with the Commission on Health and Safety and Workers’ Compensation, to adopt, after public hearings, a medical treatment utilization schedule to incorporate evidence-based, peer-reviewed, nationally recognized standards of care recommended by the commission, as specified.
This bill would authorize the administrative director to make updates to the utilization schedule by order, which would not be subject to the Administrative Procedure Act, as specified. The bill would require any order adopted pursuant to these provisions to be published on the Internet Web site of the division.
Existing law requires a deponent to receive certain expenses and reimbursements if an employer or insurance carrier requests a deposition to be taken of an injured employee, or any person claiming benefits as a dependent of an injured employee. Existing law authorizes the deponent to receive a reasonable allowance for attorney’s fees, if represented by an attorney licensed in this state.
This bill would authorize the administrative director to determine the range of reasonable fees to be paid to a deponent.
Existing law provides that it is the responsibility of any party producing a witness requiring an interpreter to arrange for the presence of a qualified interpreter. Existing law sets forth the qualifications of a qualified interpreter for these purposes, and provides for the settings under which a qualified interpreter may render services.
This bill would require the administrative director to promulgate regulations establishing criteria to verify the identity and credentials of individuals that provide interpreter services under these provisions.
Existing law requires physicians, as defined, who attend to injured or ill employees to file reports with specific information prescribed by law.
This bill would revise those reporting requirements, as prescribed.
This bill would incorporate changes to Section 4610 of the Labor Code proposed by AB 2503, to be operative as specified if both bills are enacted.
Existing constitutional provisions require that a statute that limits the right of access to the meetings of public bodies or the writings of public officials and agencies be adopted with findings demonstrating the interest protected by the limitation and the need for protecting that interest.
This bill would make legislative findings to that effect.
The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.
This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

For more information-
Bill Text
The people of the State of California do enact as follows:
Read the full text –
http://www.cqstatetrack.com/texis/redir?id=56c6cbba47

See references:

State Pain Policy Advocacy Network (SPPAN)
http://sppan.aapainmanage.org/state/california

Los Angeles Network of Care
http://losangeles.networkofcare.org/mh/legislate/state-bill-detail.aspx?bill=SB%201160&sessionid=2015000

LegInfo Legislature CA.Gov
https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201520160SB1160

CSIMS http://www.csims.org/?page=SB1160
Blog: Daisy Bill http://blog.daisybill.com/sb1160-shakes-up-workers-comp

~Update brought to you by iPain Advocacy Committee, International Pain Foundation internationalpain.org

patient-awareness-internationalpainorg-ipain

A Call for Action- 2016

A Call for Action 2016

By Twinkle VanFleet

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‎Since 2012, the estimated rise in addiction and opioid related abuse was an astounding 26.4 to 36 million people throughout the world. The accidental overdose of prescription related deaths were 4 times the amount of similar deaths in 1999.[1] According to the National Survey on Drugs Use and Health, 70 percent of all people who abused prescription analgesics got them from friends or relatives while 5 percent got them from a drug dealer or the internet.[2] While most of the focus has been on patients abusing their medications we must not lose sight that the majority of these patients take their medication as prescribed. The  negative innuendos influence the positive conclusion that long-term opioid treatment does in fact give quality of life to not only cancer patients, but non-cancerous chronic pain patients whose pain cannot be controlled any other way.

In an effort to deter abuse and/or misuse in patients, family, friends or associates, decrease the value in street sales, reduce the drug epidemic in certain populations, abuse deterrent formulations (ADF) are beneficial step forward in the diversion of the prescription drug issue.

OxyContin, Nucynta ER, Opana ER, Oxecta, Embeda, and Targiniq each contain abuse deterrent formulations (ADF) or tamper deterrent formulations (TDF). The most common form of abuse is by swallowing the medication. Other forms are chewing, swallowing, snorting, ingesting, inhaling, and injecting for the fast acting euphoric effect. Naloxone is a narcotic that reverses the effects of other narcotic medicines and can be used to treat drug overdose in emergency situations. Naltrexone hydrochloride blocks the effects of opioids by competitive binding (i.e., analogous to competitive inhibition of enzymes) at opioid receptors. Naloxone and Naltrexone are both opioid antagonists and each conclusively block the body from experiencing the opiate and related endorphins. This occurs by binding of the opioid receptors with higher than affinity than agonists, but do not activate the receptors.

TDFs will protect people who decide to modify the medication’s original form by removing the opioid for prompt use and abuse. Otherwise, extraction acts quickly and the time it takes to produce its effects can be immediate.[3]

ADF’s contain ingredients for safer distribution. Patients would continue to receive the management of pain and physicians would be less likely to stop providing access to pain care.

Not all patients should be diverted to ADF or TDF by their physicians. Patient Evaluation and Risk Stratification should be utilized to mitigate potential risks. Pharmacies and insurance companies should not be allowed to replace an Abuse Deterrent Formulation prescription opioid for a similar generic non ADF opioid. The prescription drug abuse issue has brought an adverse impression onto honest patients with incurable and intractable chronic pain syndromes and diseases and has left some pain professionals feeling perplexed.

With the continued development of these safer opioid medications we are contributing to the future of better health and pain care practices. Pain patients must remain a high priority in the midst of the current and ongoing concern that prescriptions will likely be misused or abused. It is imperative that patients be assessed on an individual basis and not as an assumption to the status quo.

We must find a balance that separates patients who truly need opioid medication to live productive lives and those who are abusing them. Responsible patients should not be punished in an attempt to crack down on prescription drugs and opioid abuse. Legislators, health care professionals and pharmaceutical companies must work together to stop opioid abuse while keeping the needs of chronic intractable pain patients in mind.

Patients are being labeled for their chronic pain identity. In the last year or more they have not been receiving their medication management either by their physicians, insurance or pharmacy. In one instance, I was informed that a patient with no history of abuse was being referred to what seemed a drug rehabilitation program in order to get her medication. If she did not comply, she would not receive.

Another gentleman, previously prescribed Suboxone for pain management, now cannot receive opioid managed care because the information in his Prescription Drug Monitoring Program insinuates prescription drug abuse.

Steps need to be taken to ensure that notes are added to the PDMP/CURES database on individuals. Suboxone itself is only an implication without verification for what the medication was prescribed for.

On behalf of those who need, not want, but need medication to sustain quality of life, I call upon our legislative leaders to be proactive in this area.  Help stop the abuse without penalizing those of us who are able to live at least a modicum of life due to the effectiveness of these prescription pain medications.

Think about it,  as if you’re needing to… no! really needing to, begging to, ease your Mama. Close your eyes and imagine.

I call on you to not make any compromises for a standard not yet met.

  1. America’s Addiction to Opioids: Heroin and Prescription Drug Abuse. Nora D. Volkow, M.D. May 14, 2014.

Senate Caucus on International Narcotics Control. NIH National Institute on Drug Abuse

http://www.drugabuse.gov/about-nida/legislative-activities/testimony-to-congress/2014/americas-addiction-to-opioids-heroin-prescription-drug-abuse

  1. 2. Prescription Drug Abuse. Office of National Drug Control Policy

http://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/prescription-drug-abuse

  1. 3. Tamper-Deterrent Opioid Formulations: Who Needs Them, and at What Cost? Robert Twillman, PhD. Pain Practitioner

http://www.aapainmanage.org/resources/articles/tamper-deterrent-opioid-formulations-who-needs-them-and-at-what-cost/

Twinkle VanFleet, Sacramento resident, pain patient, Executive Board Member and Advocacy Director for the Power of Pain Foundation.

Written Thursday, ‎December ‎04, ‎2014

Updated Wednesday October 14, 2015

Making Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Simple For a Jury

MAKING COMPLEX REGIONAL PAIN SYNDROME SIMPLE FOR A JURY

A start-to-finish strategy for proving the chronic pain and resultant damages of CRPS

When God was testing the faith of Job, the worst punishment was physical pain…. He lost his lands and property, his family – but it was not until physical pain was inflicted that Job broke. (Job 16:6).

A case dealing with chronic pain can be difficult to prove due to the subjective nature of pain itself. This is especially true for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome cases (“CRPS”). CRPS, formerly known as Reflex Sympathetic Distrophy Syndrome (“RSD”), is an incurable chronic pain condition that is often debilitating. For trial lawyers and their clients, this disorder is especially troubling because of the controversy surrounding its diagnosis and treatment. As its very name implies, the disorder is “complex” in nature, is routinely misdiagnosed, and as such, is difficult to explain and prove to a jury.

Take a recent case that had a mixed diagnosis: Some doctors thought it was CRPS, while some did not. In the end, what mattered was our client had severe pain that would likely afflict him for the rest of his life. This was something the jury understood, whether we called it CRPS or not. The primary purpose of this article is to explain the basics of CRPS, highlight some of the challenges in dealing with a CRPS case, and discuss some useful strategies from a recent trial.

CRPS – WHAT IS IT?

CRPS is a chronic pain condition most often affecting one of the limbs (arms, legs, hands, or feet), in which the pain is out of proportion to thc injury. There are two designations of CRPS: Type I and II. Typc I, which this article will focus on, is a result of trauma. Type II stems from a specific injury to a nerve.

Some researchers have said CRPS is potentially the worst chronic pain disorder a human being could endure. Doctors describe the severe cases of CRPS as being higher on the pain scale than childbirth and amputation. However, over the years, pain management practitioners were overzealous in diagnosing chronic pain patients with CRPS. In the early 1990s, “RSD” cases were popping up everywhere, perhaps in part due to the unclear diagnostic criteria at the time. Now, after the hype has calmed and thorough research has flushed out a more clear understanding of the disorder, CRPS cases can and should command the same attention as other severe injuries such as brain and spinal cord injuries.

To begin with, CRPS arises typically after an injury or trauma to the affected limb. For example, a seemingly simple fracture to the ankle eventually causing a severe pain disorder in that limb. The most frightening aspect of the disease is that it often initially begins in an arm or a leg and often spreads throughout the body. In fact, according to the National Institute of Health, 92 percent of patients state that they have experienced a spread, and 35 percent of patients report symptoms in their whole body.

CRPS is characterized by prolonged or excessive pain and mild or dramatic changes in skin color, temperature, and/or swelling in the affected area. These signs can be subtle in nature, or dramatic, depending on the severity of the CRPS.

CRPS symptoms vary in severity and duration. The key symptom is prolonged pain that may be constant and, in some people, extremely uncomfortable or severe. The pain may feel like a burning or “pins and needles” sensation, or as if someone is squeezing the affected limb. The pain may spread to include the entire arm or leg, even though the precipitating injury might have been only to a finger or toe. Pain can sometimes even travel to the opposite extremity. There is often increased sensitivity in the affected area, such that even light touch or contact is painful (called allodynia).

People with CRPS also experience constant or intermittent changes in temperature, skin color, and swelling of the affected limb. An affected arm or leg may feel warmer or cooler compared to the opposite limb. The skin on the affected limb may change color, becoming blotchy, blue, purple, pale, or red. As discussed in more detail below, due to the complexity of the disorder, CRPS cases are often overlooked, misdiagnosed, and not properly worked up.

VETTING A CRPS CASE

As trial lawyers, we appreciate that many of our clients do not have the type of medical treatment and insurance required to get a complete medical workup and diagnosis. Often, an injury like a brain bleed or spinal fracture might go misdiagnosed. With a disorder such as CRPS, this is truly one of the injuries that often require an attorney’s eye and attention to appreciate the client’s dilemma.

The following are a few points to consider when interviewing a client to determine if he or she potentially has CRPS:

• An injury causing pain which is out of proportion to injury,

• Changes in skin texture on the affected area; it may appear shiny and thin,

• Abnormal sweating pattern in the affected area or surrounding areas,

• Changes in nail and hair growth patterns,

• Stiffness in affected joints,

• Problems coordinating muscle movement, with decreased ability to move the affected body part, and,

• Abnormal movement in the affected limb (most often fixed abnormal posture, or tremors of the affected limb).

For a full CRPS potential case checklist, please contact the author.

Find out more about:

What Causes CRPS?

CRPS Diagnosis and Prognosis

How to Deal with Conflicting CRPS Diagnoses

Voir Dire Tips in a Pain Trial

Experts: Get the Dream Team

Dealing with the Defense “Expert”

Making it Simple

via Making Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Simple For a Jury.

COMPLEX REGIONAL PAIN SYNDROME

THE RELENTLESS PURSUIT OF JUSTICE

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: The Relentless Pursuit of Justice

Causes

Symptoms

Diagnosis and Risk Factors

Prognosis and Treatment

Lawsuits and Damages

Spencer Lucas is a trial lawyer at Panish Shea & Boyle and specializes in complex catastrophic personal injury, products liability and wrongful death cases.  He has extensive experience in cases involving traumatic brain injuries, spinal cord injuries, and chronic pain.

Panish Shea & Boyle, LLP

11111 Santa Monica Blvd #700, Los Angeles, CA 90025

PHONE 877.800.1700

FAX 310.477.1699

Power of Pain Foundation Co Sponsor Assembly Bill 623

california-sacramento-state-capitol-1Yesterday the Power of Pain Foundation Co-Sponsored AB 623 with Assembly Member Wood at the California State Capital in Sacramento where the bill was officially introduced.  I spoke on behalf of both pain patients and opioid abuse. In attendance with me and on behalf of POPF and the bill was Erik VanFleet, Kharisma VanFleet, Debbie Ellis, and Brandy Ellis.

Speaking at the event was: Assemblymember Wood (author), Assemblymember Levine, Mendocino County Sheriff Tom Allman,  Ralph A. Cansimbe, Chapter Commander PFC Alejandro R. Ruiz Chapter, American G.I. Forum, Representatives from bill sponsors US Pain Foundation, Power of Pain and American Chronic Pain Foundations and the CA Academy of Physician Assistants.

Legislation to Curb Prescription Drug Deaths UnveiledAB623_March242015_POPFCoSponsorWithAssemblymanWood

Published on Mar 26, 2015

(Sacramento) – California legislators, public health representatives and law enforcement officials announced new legislation at a State Capitol news conference to curb prescription drug abuse and deaths. Assembly Bill 623, authored by Assemblyman Jim Wood (D-Healdsburg), aims to reduce prescription drug abuse-related deaths by reducing their access to those most prone to abusing them. More than 60 people die every day in the United States from prescription drug overdoses. Approximately 6.5 million people in the US abused prescription drugs in 2013, more than double those that abused heroin, cocaine and hallucinogens combined. “Narcotic pain medications, or opioids, have an important role in our health care system,” said Assemblymember Wood, who is a licensed dentist. “They provide effective relief for the millions of Americans who suffer from chronic pain. But too easily they are getting into the wrong hands.” Here’s more in this Assembly Access video.http://www.asmdc.org/wood

Watch the Press Conference on Assembly Live

AB623_March242015_POPFCoSponsorWithAssemblymanWood_1

My speech-

Hello, My name is T. VanFleet, I am the Advocacy Director and Executive Board Member of the Power of Pain Foundation. I am also a pain patient myself. Through painful trial and error, my physicians and I have finally found the appropriate combination of medications to provide some relief from my debilitating symptoms. The prescription medications that I take allow me to do things that most people take for granted. Now, I celebrate small triumphs such as cooking, occasionally attending a function, and watching my grandson grow. One of the medications that helped give me my life back is a prescription opioid. A type of medication which has recently come under increased scrutiny due to heavy abuse by some.

Unfortunately, people who use prescription medications as intended can become unfortunate casualties of efforts to regulate opioid abuse, as we end up getting lumped in with those who misuse treatments. It is difficult to obtain refills,, denials and delays by pharmacists and insurance, including workers compensation leave patients in withdrawal and un-manageable circumstances including suicidal ideation.

Fortunately, there are new weapons available to help combat prescription opioid abuse which do not sacrifice the many patients who legitimately use the medications to fight pain. New “abuse deterrent formulations” (ADF) for opioids have properties that make it difficult or undesirable for someone to tamper with them. These medications are made with physical and chemical barriers, such as a special kind of coating or hardness to the pill itself, that won’t allow them to be chewed, crushed, cut, grated, ground up, or melted with water or alcohol.

The Power of Pain Foundation strongly believes that California policymakers must enact policies such as AB 623 to help develop a strong, lasting solution to the health crisis of prescription opioid abuse. We must find a balance that separates patients who truly need opioid medication to live productive lives and those who are abusing them. Responsible patients should not be punished in an attempt to crack down on prescription drug mis-use and abuse. Legislators, health care professionals and pharmaceutical companies must work together to stop opioid abuse while keeping the needs of chronic pain patients front-of-mind.

<end>

—-

I was honored to support this bill with Assemblyman Wood on behalf of the Power of Pain Foundation. It’s important that we assist in the prescription opioid drug abuse problem. This will help responsible pain patients get access to the care they need. Too many are denied now because of the stigma attached to their chronic pain identity. Abuse deterrent formulation’s will assist both issues.

AB623_March242015_POPFCoSponsorWithAssemblymanWood_2

Press Release Article Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Legislation to Curb Prescription Drug Deaths Unveiled by Assemblyman Jim Wood

For more information on the Power of Pain Foundation’s Policy Efforts, please visit-

Power of Pain Foundation | Policy Efforts | PatientAwareness.org

patient-awareness1-popf

-Friday March 20, 2014 Episode of

The Burning for a Cure show

With Hosts POPF President, Barby Ingle and POPF Executive Board Member & Marketing Director and Promotions Chairman – Joeygiggles and Co-Hosts Executive Board Member and Advocacy Chairwoman Twinkle VanFleet with Power of Pain Foundation Executive Director Ken Taylor.

Discussion: Legislation- Abuse Deterrent Formulation (ADF), more  Listen Here

Out in the real world, I try not to identify as a pain patient. We will be judged. You know it, and I know it. It becomes our label. As I attempt to go forward in advocacy it can sometimes be a little awkward. Not in my physical appearance, but In my inability to speak properly, delays, memory, forgetfulness, stuttering, wake-sleep, sleep-wake. I’m heading into my 15th year with CRPS type 2. My Neurocognitive deficit seemed a rapid decline. It’s part of the story that helps me fight to go on, for my family, for you.

You have to hang on to you! It’s okay to not be perfect. It’s okay to not be your “yesterday”.

The struggle is real. We are who we’ve become.  And it really is okay in all that it is. We might not like it, but we have to learn to accept it.

POPF-CoSponsor-AB623_BrandyEllis_DebbieEllis_TwinkleVanFleet_March242015PostPressConferenceCaliforniaStateCapital

Perfection is all that you can achieve in the here and the now. Getting that shower, getting dressed, combing our hair. Those are the triumphs.

There’s so much worth in the smallest things.

I believe in you! Believe in you, too.

Thank you Barby Ingle for always believing in me and my ability even when I didn’t.

POPF_AB623_KharismaVanFleet_BrandyEllis_DebbieEllis_TwinkleVanFleet_March242015
Lets try to remember to not pre-judge a chronic pain patient on appearance or preconceived notions, but instead, assess on diagnosis, and credibility. ~Twinkle V.

In Your State | Compassion & Choices

Recent Developments

California

Compassion & Choices (C&C) California is campaigning for the End of Life Options Act, which was introduced in the state legislature by Senators Bill Monning and Lois Wolk on January 21, 2015, dramatically accelerating C&C’s 5-year plan to make aid in dying an open, accessible and legitimate medical practice in California. C&C California continues to build bottom-up support at the city and county levels and is driving the grassroots to press for statewide aid-in-dying legislation. At an emotional press conference with lawmakers announcing the bill, powerful C&C advocates spoke out for end-of-life options, including Jennifer Glass, Anita Freeman, and Brittany Maynard’s family – mother Debbie Ziegler, widower Dan Diaz and his brother, Adrian – who returned home to California after Brittany’s death in Oregon.

Read more Recent Developments-

via In Your State | Compassion & Choices.

Opportunity to join Advocacy Committee

As the Committee Chairwoman for Advocacy, I would like to emphasize the importance of connecting a unified populace for better access to care.

Our community constitutes a commonwealth of patients with various diseases and who are in various stages of their illness. The Power of Pain Foundation
advocates for several different distinctive medical conditions.

I am now seeking applicants from those interested in joining my committee. These are all volunteer positions. Since I am diverse, I prefer those choosing to
work with me to be also. I appreciate diversity and so does the Power of Pain Foundation.

If you are ready to help work on access to care, abuse deterrent formulations, prior authorizations, specialty tier’s, step therapy/fail first and other
issues that we can tackle together, please contact me.

I am passionate about my role as Advocacy Director. I am seeking 7 individuals who aren’t afraid to raise their voice when needed.

1- Legislative and Advocacy Assistant (National)
1- Research (National)
1- CRPS/RSD (National)
2- Neuropathy/Nerve (National)
2- Help oversee my Region. Region 1 (NW) including Alaska, California (Northern), Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming

While a pain related illness with experience and knowledge is a plus, it is not necessary.

Email me: Twinkle.CA@powerofpain.org

With the position you are interested in, Tell me about yourself and how can we help each other to help others?
List any experience. Please don’t over-think it.

Together, we can!
~Twinkle VanFleet
Executive Board Member/Advocacy Director Power of Pain Foundation
POPFLogo