National Pain Strategy PAINS Collaborators Meeting Recap – COMMUNITY PAIN CENTER

National Pain Strategy PAINS Collaborators Meeting Recap

By Barby Ingle, Power of Pain Foundation President

On June 29 and 30, 2015, the Pain Action Alliance to Implement a National Strategy (PAINS), a group of over 100 pain collaborators and stakeholders, came together in Washington DC to discuss the National Pain Strategy (NPS). The purpose was to provide attendees an opportunity to discuss the NPS and find areas of agreement on next steps, collaborations, priorities, and to hold accountable those responsible for implementation.As the president of the Power of Pain Foundation, I was invited to participate. I went into the meeting with some preconceived notions based on little happening since the Institute of Medicine’s report in 2011 and didn’t expect much to be accomplished. To my great surprise, the meeting exceeded my expectations. I left the meeting feeling that a path toward implementation of stronger access to care issues was clarified as a result of the meeting. I am excited to be one of the attendees present that will be helping move a chronic pain agenda forward, making a difference in the lives of those living with pain.The goals of the meeting were to encourage collaboration among key pain community leaders, to promote the NPS report and build enthusiasm for it, and to facilitate conversations about how to move forward to implementation of the strategy outlined in the report.For me, the meeting clarified the path ahead for the NPS in terms of priorities,implementation, next steps, funding,leadership and accountability. One of the unintended outcomes from the meeting was the consensus to support the messaging of the Chronic Pain Advocacy Task Force (CPATF). The CPATF is a group of 17 consumer advocacy groups convened by the State Pain Policy Action Network (SPPAN), which is a program of the American Academy of Pain Management (AAPM). As a founding member of the CPATF and the representative of one of the 17 groups involved, I was very proud to see that our work was recognized by this larger group of collaborators and stakeholders. As agreed upon, the core messages are: Chronic pain is a real and complex disease that may exist by itself or be linked with other medical conditions.Chronic pain is both an under-recognized and under-resourced public health crisis with devastating personal and economic impact. Effective chronic pain care requires access to a wide range of treatment options, including biomedical, behavioral health and complementary treatment. Denying appropriate care to people with chronic pain is unethical and can lead to unnecessary suffering, depression, disability, and even suicide.

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Source: National Pain Strategy PAINS Collaborators Meeting Recap – COMMUNITY PAIN CENTER

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Microglia Activation Causes Depression, Anxiety in Chronic Pain

June 11, 2015

Brain inflammation from chronic pain increases microglia activation, which inhibits the release of dopamine and may lead to depression and anxiety, according to a study published in The Journal of Neuroscience.

Although more than half of chronic pain patients experience depression, anxiety, or substance abuse, scientists were unable to determine what caused this association until now. In this study, the researchers sought to test if chronic pain disrupted the transmission of dopamine.

The researchers demonstrated that the activation of microglia in mice with chronic pain inhibited the release of dopamine. These results shed light on why opioids, which stimulate a dopamine response, can be ineffective for chronic pain patients.

The researchers instead tested a drug that inhibited the activation of microglia. This, they found, restored normal dopamine release and reward-motivated behavior in the mice.

“For over 20 years, scientists have been trying to unlock the mechanisms at work that connect opioid use, pain relief, depression and addiction,” said Catherine Cahill, PhD, of the University of California, Irvine. “Our findings represent a paradigm shift which has broad implications that are not restricted to the problem of pain and may translate to other disorders.”­

In future studies, the researchers hope to explore if mood disorders are caused by similar brain alterations, regardless of the presence of chronic pain.

Read more-

via Microglia Activation Causes Depression, Anxiety in Chronic Pain.

Read the full article at:

The Journal of Neuroscience

Microglia Disrupt Mesolimbic Reward Circuitry in Chronic Pain

Brain alterations and neurocognitive dysfunction in patients with complex regional pain syndrome

April 2015

Highlights

  • Significant cortical thinning in the prefrontal cortex was observed in CRPS patients.
  • Patients with CRPS made significantly more perseverative errors on the WCST.
  • Patients with CRPS showed significantly longer stop-signal response time.
  • The alterations may explain executive dysfunction and disinhibited pain perception.

Abstract

Few studies have examined the involvement of specific sub-regions of the prefrontal cortex in complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). We analyzed cortical thickness to identify morphological differences in local brain structures between patients with CRPS and healthy control subjects (HCs). Furthermore, we evaluated the correlation between cortical thickness and neurocognitive function. Cortical thickness was measured in 25 patients with CRPS and 25 HCs using the FreeSurfer method. Pain severity and psychiatric symptoms were assessed using the Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire and the Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories (BDI and BAI), respectively. Neurocognitive function was assessed via the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and the stop-signal task (SST). The right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and left ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) were significantly thinner in CRPS patients than in HCs. CRPS patients made more perseveration errors on the WCST and had longer SST reaction times compared with HCs. Although BDI and BAI differ significantly between the groups, they were not correlated with cortical thickness. Our study suggests that the pathophysiology of CRPS may be related to reduced cortical thickness in the DLPFC and VMPFC. The structural alterations in DLPFC may explain executive dysfunction and disinhibited pain perception in CRPS.

Read more-

via Brain alterations and neurocognitive dysfunction in patients with complex regional pain syndrome.

Article in Press (see also)

Brain alterations and neurocognitive dysfunction in patients with complex regional pain syndrome

http://www.jpain.org/article/S1526-5900(15)00599-4/abstract

 

High-Frequency Surpasses Traditional Spinal Cord Stimulation in First Controlled Trial Comparing Technologies

Released: 24-Mar-2015 2:05 PM EDT 

Newswise — March 24, 2015, NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. –- The first-ever randomized, controlled trial to compare spinal cord stimulation (SCS) technologies found that high-frequency SCS using 10 kHz (HF10) exceeded lower-frequency, traditional SCS in response rate and pain relief. Further, this was achieved without the paresthesia that may cause discomfort with traditional SCS, the researchers reported in a scientific poster at the 31st Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Pain Medicine.

Traditional SCS low-frequency (~50 Hz) stimulation is an attempt to mask the sensation of pain with a tingling or buzzing sensation, known as paresthesia. Therefore, the therapeutic goal with traditional SCS is to cover the areas of pain with paresthesias, explained B. Todd Sitzman, M.D., M.P.H., medical director of Advanced Pain Therapy, PLLC, in Hattiesburg, Miss.

In contrast, “high-frequency HF10 therapy utilizes a stimulation frequency that is orders of magnitude higher than traditional SCS,” Sitzman said. “HF10 therapy does not produce paresthesias and achieves superior back and leg pain relief.”

More importantly, HF10 therapy was shown to be superior to traditional SCS in all of the study-related primary and secondary endpoints, including response rate and pain relief. The magnitude of back pain relief was consistent with previous European research of HF10 therapy (Van Buyten et al, Neuromodulation 2013;16(1):59-65; Al-Kaisy et al, Pain Med 2014;15(3):347-54).

The use of SCS, introduced in 1967, has expanded as a treatment for difficult pain syndromes, encompassing peripheral neuropathies, complex regional pain syndromes, peripheral vascular disease and other disorders in addition to failed back surgery syndrome (Deer, Techniques in Regional Anesthesia and Pain Management 1998 2(3):161-7).

Traditional low-frequency SCS systems are widely used in clinical practice. However, the scientific literature indicates that achieving back pain coverage with traditional SCS is technically difficult and is often not sustained over time. (North et al, Neurosurgery 2005;57(5):990-62005; Frey et al, Pain Physician 2009;12(2):379-97). According to one report, 71 percent of patients who received an implant with traditional SCS experienced discomfort from the stimulation of paresthesia (Kuechmann et al, Abstract. Pain in Europe VI [EFIC], Lisbon, Portugal: Sept. 9-12, 2009). In the current study, 44 percent of patients receiving traditional SCS reported uncomfortable stimulation.

The study was a prospective, randomized, multicenter, comparative trial of the investigational HF10 vs. the standard SCS therapy, designed in consultation with and monitored by the FDA. Institutional review board approval was obtained for each study site.

The 12-month follow-up data indicated that the responder rate with HF10 therapy was twice that with traditional SCS for both back and leg pain. Also, the average degree of pain relief with HF10 therapy was more than 50 percent greater than with traditional SCS. The level-1 evidence with 12-month follow-up meets today’s rigorous standards for evidence-based healthcare and complies with regulatory agency and payer preference for comparative effectiveness, the investigators said.

“These results provide important comparative effectiveness data for healthcare providers and clinically relevant information for pain physicians, patients and payers,” Sitzman said.

At present, HF10 therapy is investigational in the United States. The manufacturer of the device, Nevro Corp., which funded this study, anticipates obtaining market approval from the FDA by mid-2015.

Poster 140 – Rationale for the SENZA-RCT Study Design and Comparative Outcomes

About AAPM

The American Academy of Pain Medicine is the premier medical association for pain physicians and their treatment teams with over 2,500 members. Now in its 32nd year of service, the Academy’s mission is to optimize the health of patients in pain and eliminate pain as a major public health problem by advancing the practice and specialty of pain medicine through education, training, advocacy and research. Information is available on the Academy’s website at http://www.painmed.org.

via High-Frequency Surpasses Traditional Spinal Cord Stimulation in First Controlled Trial Comparing Technologies.

Power of Pain Foundation- ADF and Access to Care

 

AZ State Capitol BuildingADF

Power of Pain Foundation recognizes that Abuse Deterrent Formulations are only a step forward
toward drug diversion. We know this isn’t the final answer. It allows an option for patients to
continue to be treated with opioid analgesics and removes many of the barriers involved in non abuse
deterrent medication.

 

POPF Pain Community Needs Assessment Survey

We are not focusing on any one treatment option, we are improving upon the patient/provider
relationship.

The purpose of our survey was to determine who is having trouble getting access to quality care.
who is being dismissed, who is being cared for by a primary physician, who is being sent to pain
management and who is having difficulty receiving ongoing pain care.

We are aware of many individuals who are not receiving proper medication management or treatment
and others who had been receiving care that are now facing obstacles.

Our goal is continued access to care. Our goal is patient empowerment.

Recent Articles

INEFFECTIVE TREATMENT ASSOCIATED WITH THE CHRONIFICATION OF PAIN by Barby Ingle
http://www.lynnwebstermd.com/ineffective-treatment-associated-with-the-chronification-of-pain/

BARBY INGLE ON CHRONIC PAIN AND OPIOIDS by Barby Ingle
http://www.lynnwebstermd.com/guest-post-barby-ingle-on-chronic-pain-and-opioids/

The Unintended Side Effects of Fighting Prescription Drug Abuse by Twinkle VanFleet
http://www.californiaprogressreport.com/site/unintended-side-effects-fighting-prescription-drug-abuseTwinkleV_SB1258

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barby Ingle: Tamper-proof pain drugs deserve support

http://www.desertsun.com/story/opinion/contributors/2015/02/28/ingle-pain-medication-%20tech/24144627/
With the Power of Pain Foundation as a sponsor of the new bill AB 623 on Abuse Deterrent
Formulations, the above article  Op-Ed by our President has special significance being published 2/28/2015.
#RareDiseaseDay http://www.rarediseaseday.org/

Our President also wrote articles for for WA, NV, AZ, and CA.
She wrote letters to legislators in MD, MO, UT, CO, AZ.
BarbyIngle-FillYourPrescriptionOfHope
We are committed to you!

 

Power of Pain Foundation Advocacy Committee
Twinkle VanFleet, Board Member, Advocacy Chariwoman

Inflammatory Cytokine Cascade | 420 InSight

One of the most important health benefits of cannabinoids is their anti-inflammatory property. In this, they are strong modulators of the inflammatory cytokine cascade. Numerous disease states arise out of chronic inflammation; such as, depression, dementias including Alzheimer’s, cancer, arthritis and other autoimmune disorders, viral infection, HIV, brain injury, etc.

Inflammatory cytokines can be activated by oxidative stress and disease states. Cannabinoids, being immunomodulators interrupt the cytokine inflammatory cascade so that local inflammation does not result in tissue pathology. Thus we are spared morbid or terminal illnesses.4

If our own endocannabinoid system can maintain metabolic homeostasis and even cure seri- ous disease, why are we plagued by illness? We know that the body produces only small amounts of anandamide and 2-AG; enough to maintain the body but not enough to overcome chronic stress, illness, injury, or malnutrition. Cannabis is the only plant we know of that produces phyto-cannabinoids that mimic our own endocannabinoids. One of the great benefits of this mimetic medicine is that cannabinoids are essentially natural to our biology and do no harm to our tissues and systems.

It is well known that most diseases of aging are inflammatory in origin, thus making cannabis the best anti-aging supplement we could take to avoid arthritis, dementia, hypertension, diabetes, osteoporosis, and cancer. This is our key to good health and long life.

Since it is such an important attribute, as well as being independent of the cannabinoid receptor system, let’s look a little deeper into the ability of cannabinoids to inhibit the inflammatory cytokine cascade. Inflammation is good for us, a little here, a little there; it brings T-cells and macrophages to infection sites. This is good. However, chronic inflammation can cause serious illness and death. How do phytocannabinoids rescue us from dreaded infirmities? When the call comes in to the immune system to send troops, the first thing to happen is that the immune system signals glial cells to produce cytokines. Once this cat is out of the bag, the process can go one of two ways.

A) Killer cells clean up the infection and all is well.

B) Cytokines can stimulate more cytokine production and cause many more cytokine receptors to awaken. Unchecked, this becomes a cytokine storm showing symptoms of swelling, redness, fatigue, and nausea; even death.

Read the full in depth article-

via Inflammatory Cytokine Cascade | 420 InSight.

Microchips completes development, clinical demonstration of drug delivery platform – Pharmaceutical Business Review

Published 16 December 2014

“Unlike traditional drug delivery platforms, Microchips Biotech’s implant is capable of responding to wireless signals, which can activate, deactivate or modify the frequency or dose of the drug, without requiring removal.”

Read more-

via Microchips completes development, clinical demonstration of drug delivery platform – Pharmaceutical Business Review.