No Catastrophic Injury? No Psychiatric PD | Workers Compensation Columns | WorkCompCentral

No Catastrophic Injury? No Psychiatric PD

  • State: California

 

For injuries on and after Jan. 1, 2013, there shall be no increase in impairment ratings for the compensable consequence of a physical injury resulting in psyche, sleep, or sexual dysfunction or any combination thereof, an exception thereto being catastrophic injury which includes but is not limited to loss of a limb, paralysis, severe burn, or severe head injury.

Clearly the legislature, in enacting Senate Bill 863, continues the march to restrict psychiatric claims. This should reduce what now appears to be a routine of some physicians who report compensable consequence psychiatric injury, but the Labor Code and regulations are silent as to what constitutes catastrophic injury and, as we all know, this breeds mischief.

What is the reach of restricting indemnity for psychological injuries flowing from physical injuries under SB 863?

Newly enacted Labor Code §4660 1 C (1) states in pertinent part that except as provided in paragraph (2), there shall be no increases in impairment ratings for sleep dysfunction, sexual dysfunction, or psychiatric disorder, or any combination thereof, arising out of a compensable consequence injury. Nothing in this section shall limit the ability of an injured employee to obtain treatment for sleep dysfunction, sexual dysfunction or psychiatric disorder, if any, that are a consequence of an industrial injury.

A stated exception to the new rule barring increase permanent impairment in compensable psyche injuries flowing from physical injuries is spelled out in Labor Code §4660 1 C (2) which states that an increased impairment rating for psychiatric disorder shall not be subject to paragraph (1) if the compensable psychiatric injuries resulted from either applicant being a victim of violent act or direct exposure to a significant act within the meaning of Labor Code §3208.3 (b) or a catastrophic injury including but not limited to loss of a limb, paralysis, severe burn, or severe head injury.

This newly enacted provision specifically uses the term “catastrophic injury” as opposed to “catastrophic event.”

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via No Catastrophic Injury? No Psychiatric PD | Workers Compensation Columns | WorkCompCentral.

Neuropathy: Is Neuropathy Affecting Your Sleep?

People who sleep poorly are also susceptible to depression and other mood disorders, changes in eating, decrease in physical activity, and an overall decline in health. Compounded with neuropathy, this becomes a vicious cycle.

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via Neuropathy: Is Neuropathy Affecting Your Sleep?.

Microchips completes development, clinical demonstration of drug delivery platform – Pharmaceutical Business Review

Published 16 December 2014

“Unlike traditional drug delivery platforms, Microchips Biotech’s implant is capable of responding to wireless signals, which can activate, deactivate or modify the frequency or dose of the drug, without requiring removal.”

Read more-

via Microchips completes development, clinical demonstration of drug delivery platform – Pharmaceutical Business Review.

‘Placebo therapy’ ineffective for long-term chronic pain relief

December 11, 2014

Dr Andreas Goebel, from the University’s Institute of Translational Medicine, explains: We found that patients experienced significant pain relief minutes after a placebo therapy, such as salt water injections, but unexpectedly at a later time, and even with repeated placebo applications, there was minimal or no impact on reducing the symptoms of the condition.”

The results suggest that CRPS will not improve naturally over time, and there is little fluctuation in the pain intensity of the condition.

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via ‘Placebo therapy’ ineffective for long-term chronic pain relief.

Pain Medicine News – Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment

ISSUE: DECEMBER 2014 | VOLUME: 12(12)

“At least 50,000 new cases of CRPS are diagnosed in the United States annually.1 Although the incidence rate is subject to debate, a large epidemiologic study from The Netherlands involving 600,000 patients suggests an incidence of 26.2 per 100,000 individuals.”

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via Pain Medicine News – Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

Opportunity to join Advocacy Committee

As the Committee Chairwoman for Advocacy, I would like to emphasize the importance of connecting a unified populace for better access to care.

Our community constitutes a commonwealth of patients with various diseases and who are in various stages of their illness. The Power of Pain Foundation
advocates for several different distinctive medical conditions.

I am now seeking applicants from those interested in joining my committee. These are all volunteer positions. Since I am diverse, I prefer those choosing to
work with me to be also. I appreciate diversity and so does the Power of Pain Foundation.

If you are ready to help work on access to care, abuse deterrent formulations, prior authorizations, specialty tier’s, step therapy/fail first and other
issues that we can tackle together, please contact me.

I am passionate about my role as Advocacy Director. I am seeking 7 individuals who aren’t afraid to raise their voice when needed.

1- Legislative and Advocacy Assistant (National)
1- Research (National)
1- CRPS/RSD (National)
2- Neuropathy/Nerve (National)
2- Help oversee my Region. Region 1 (NW) including Alaska, California (Northern), Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming

While a pain related illness with experience and knowledge is a plus, it is not necessary.

Email me: Twinkle.CA@powerofpain.org

With the position you are interested in, Tell me about yourself and how can we help each other to help others?
List any experience. Please don’t over-think it.

Together, we can!
~Twinkle VanFleet
Executive Board Member/Advocacy Director Power of Pain Foundation
POPFLogo

Treating Pain That Won’t Go Away – Ithaca Times : Family And Health

Posted: Thursday, December 4, 2014 12:03 pm

By Bill Chaisson

“There are two types of CRPS. Type 1, which accounts for 90 percent of documented cases, according to the Mayo Clinic, is marked by nerve pain when no nerve damage was involved in the initial injury. Type 2 is a more explicable development of regional pain after damage to the nerves.”

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via Treating Pain That Won’t Go Away – Ithaca Times : Family And Health.