P.A.I.N.S. National Pain Management Conference hosted by Power of Pain Foundation

P.A.I.N.Summit

  • Saturday, September 14, 2013

  • 9:00am
  • Scottsdale Healthcare Shea

  • The 7th Annual P.A.I.N. Summit hosted by the Power of Pain Foundation provides a great avenue for pain education for providers, patients and their caregivers. This year’s conference consists of an exhibit area and educational sessions that focus on better diagnosis and treatment options for pain patients, chronic pain issues (as a whole), prescription monitoring programs, and Proper Opioid Management. There will be breakfast, lunch and afternoon snack provided to attendees.

     

    RSVP Required: http://painsummit2013.eventbrite.com/, Limited in-person space.

     

    The event will be hosted by Brittany Brannon, Miss Arizona USA 2011, model, and RSD patient. The event will also feature two celebrity speakers, Dr. Natalie Stand, MD winner of the

    Amazing Race, and WWE star and professional wrestler, Raven.

     

    The day will consist of two sessions.

     

    8am – 1:00pm The morning sessions are focused for healthcare providers. This includes all areas of expertise; anesthesiologists, complementary medicine specialists, emergency room, general practitioners, internal medicine, neurologists, nurses, orthopedics, pharmacists, physiatrists, physician assistants, primary care physicians, psychiatrists, surgeons, and therapists. Any clinician who practices, or is interested in practicing, pain management from an integrative perspective, will benefit from the meeting. HCP’s will be introduced to the rapidly expanding field of diagnosis and treatment. This conference will proved attendees a greater awareness and understanding of the need to appropriately identify, diagnose (HCPs only) and treat/seek treatment of common types of pain, including fibromyalgia, painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy and other chronic pain conditions.

     

    1:30pm – 4:30pm The afternoon sessions will be filled with patients and their family/ caregivers. This portion of the conference will provide attendees a greater awareness and understanding of the need to appropriately identify, and treat/seek treatment of common types of pain.

     

    There is no charge to attend this conference.

     

    Schedule (tentative)

    HCP Sessions

    8:00 am – 4:00 pm Ongoing Registration Breakfast served Hosted by Brittany Brannon

     

    8:15 am – 9:00 am Keynote address: Preventing complications that arise from diabetes such as peripheral neuropathy (pain) Dr. Natalie Stand, MD, Amazing Race Winner, USC Pain Clinic

     

    9:10 am – 9:55 am An Integrative Approach to Chronic Pain Dr. Philip Getson, DO, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA

     

    9:55 am – 10:40 am Cultural Competency and the Patient in Pain Dr. Maged Hamza, Virginia Commonwealth University Pain Clinic Director, Richmond, VA

     

    10:40 am – 11:20 Evidence Based Chronic Pain Care Linda Watkins, PhD, University of Colorado

     

    11:20 am – 12:00 Complementary Medicine and its role in Chronic Pain Management (TBD)

     

    12:00 pm – 1:00 Open Discussion with the Speakers and Attendees Lunch is served, Exhibitors

     

    Patient/ Caregiver Sessions

    1:30 pm – 2:30pm An Integrative Approach to Chronic Pain Dr. Philip Getson, DO, Drexel University, NJ

     

    2:30 pm – 3:15 pm Prescription Drug Monitor program Explained Rob Kronenberg, PharmD

     

    3:15 pm – 4:00pm The Patients Perspective; At Home Pain Coping Skills Raven WWE Wrestler, Barby Ingle Power of Pain Foundation, and Diane Kennelly AZ Fibromyalgia Group Leader, Dr. Tory McJunkin, Arizona Pain Specialists

     

    If you are unable to attend in person, you can attend by watching our UStream Channel http://www.ustream.tv/channel/power-of-pain-foundation

Microglia- A Promising Target for Treating Neuropathic Pain

Modulation of microglia can attenuate neuropathic pain symptoms and enhance morphine effectiveness.

Abstract

Microglia play a crucial role in the maintenance of neuronal homeostasis in the central nervous system, and microglia production of immune factors is believed to play an important role in nociceptive transmission. There is increasing evidence that uncontrolled activation of microglial cells under neuropathic pain conditions induces the release of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin – IL-1beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor – TNF-alpha), complement components (C1q, C3, C4, C5, C5a) and other substances that facilitate pain transmission. Additionally, microglia activation can lead to altered activity of opioid systems and neuropathic pain is characterized by resistance to morphine. Pharmacological attenuation of glial activation represents a novel approach for controlling neuropathic pain. It has been found that propentofylline, pentoxifylline, fluorocitrate and minocycline decrease microglial activation and inhibit proinflammatory cytokines, thereby suppressing the development of neuropathic pain. The results of many studies support the idea that modulation of glial and neuroimmune activation may be a potential therapeutic mechanism for enhancement of morphine analgesia. Researchers and pharmacological companies have embarked on a new approach to the control of microglial activity, which is to search for substances that activate anti-inflammatory cytokines like IL-10. IL-10 is very interesting since it reduces allodynia and hyperalgesia by suppressing the production and activity of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-6. Some glial inhibitors, which are safe and clinically well tolerated, are potential useful agents for treatment of neuropathic pain and for the prevention of tolerance to morphine analgesia. Targeting glial activation is a clinically promising method for treatment of neuropathic pain.

Microglia: a promising target for treating neuropathic and postoperative pain, and morphine tolerance.

Source

Department of Anesthesiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

Management of chronic pain, such as nerve-injury-induced neuropathic pain associated with diabetic neuropathy, viral infection, and cancer, is a real clinical challenge. Major surgeries, such as breast and thoracic surgery, leg amputation, and coronary artery bypass surgery, also lead to chronic pain in 10-50% of individuals after acute postoperative pain, partly due to surgery-induced nerve injury. Current treatments mainly focus on blocking neurotransmission in the pain pathway and have only resulted in limited success. Ironically, chronic opioid exposure might lead to paradoxical pain. Development of effective therapeutic strategies requires a better understanding of cellular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. Progress in pain research points to an important role of microglial cells in the development of chronic pain. Spinal cord microglia are strongly activated after nerve injury, surgical incision, and chronic opioid exposure. Increasing evidence suggests that, under all these conditions, the activated microglia not only exhibit increased expression of microglial markers CD 11 b and Iba 1, but also display elevated phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Inhibition of spinal cord p38 has been shown to attenuate neuropathic and postoperative pain, as well as morphine-induced antinociceptive tolerance. Activation of p38 in spinal microglia results in increased synthesis and release of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor and the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α. These microglia-released mediators can powerfully modulate spinal cord synaptic transmission, leading to increased excitability of dorsal horn neurons, that is, central sensitization, partly via suppressing inhibitory synaptic transmission. Here, we review studies that support the pronociceptive role of microglia in conditions of neuropathic and postoperative pain and opioid tolerance. We conclude that targeting microglial signaling might lead to more effective treatments for devastating chronic pain after diabetic neuropathy, viral infection, cancer, and major surgeries, partly via improving the analgesic efficacy of opioids.