Overcoming Challenging Obstacles

Excerpts from, Overcoming Challenging Obstacles by Twinkle VanFleet below.

The past few years have been a test of strength, endurance, and possibilities amidst constant setbacks to overcome. 5 years after the injury that led to my CRPS, I did go back to school for a degree in Corporate Publishing. At the end of 2006 I took leave to have my permanent Spinal Cord Stimulator implanted and I returned approximately 10 weeks later. Due to not being able to drive any longer, my husband took me and picked me up in between his own full-time work schedule. By 2007, I wasn’t able to keep up any longer. My grandson was born in 2006, too. My husbands first heart attack when he was 37, 2 stent placements, his Diabetes diagnosis, he only used accumulated vacation time for it and returned to work in a weeks time. In 2007, we bought or first home, but he also lost his 13 year career and stability when his company C.S.A.A. (AAA) relocated out of California. I continued to raise awareness for chronic pain, met Trudy Thomas, became a leader at MD Junction’s RSD Support and remained for 3 years. My own support group which I began on My Space in 2003 was moved to Facebook, yet I didn’t move the members with it. I like for people to find us rather than to send out invites or notify. I met Barby through Trudy. My son had a traumatic brain injury in August of 2011 and my husband had a second heart attack within a year. I stayed in the PICU with Ozra for 10 days. In December of 2012 I stayed at the hospital with my husband for the entire 9 days during his quadruple bypass surgery, the first few days I slept in the van. In 2012, I had Gall bladder surgery and in 2013 I had another Gall bladder surgery which included the removal of part of my liver and multiple hemangioma’s. http://rsdadvisory.com/2013/07/17/gall-bladder-fiasco-continued-and-hopefully-the-final-chapter/

2014 my daughters liver disease, our sons birth defect diagnosis from Shriners Children’s Hospital unrelated to his TBI and my surgery to have my SCS battery replaced. Piece of cake, mostly. 2015 started with a bang and 3 weeks of hard Cymbalta, Zonegran, and Clonazapam withdrawal due to WC delaying Rx refills. The other 2 weren’t filled either, but really no effects from them as much as the other 3. I no longer take Clonazapam or get the Lidoderm. It hasn’t been easy, especially when Clonazapam did help and pain management medication was and is already at the lowest minimum. I already do all that I can to minimize my own agony and I practice these coping strategies each and every day. My husband just had surgery to repair a torn shoulder a few months ago and we just learned by MRI he has another tear in his knee. We’re still learning all we can at Stanford for our daughter. Rikki is managing well. My purpose is in helping others, it’s all I’ve ever done one way or another, but it isn’t my passion. I’ve come to realize it can’t be. It’s not the fire flickering about the dancing flames that motivates my spirit to fly. My bucket-list goal survives all this. It’s not writing, I have that. It’s not policy, POP gave me that opportunity again. It’s much deeper than that, at least for me. Our son and oldest daughter are moving in together on the 1st. My man and I will have our home to ourselves. January 26th begins my 16th year. I’m not sure where 2016 will take us, I just know I take a lickin’ and keep on tickin’ … for mine.

Overcoming Challenging Obstacles

“Pain isn’t in our head, but it is in our brain, and our minds. Pain is sent from the spinal cord, sending messages to our brain, back to our spinal cord and up and down those nerve pathways. Pain signals reach our endorphins, limbic system, https://www.dartmouth.edu/~rswenson/NeuroSci/chapter_9.html hypothalamus, where they then affect our emotions and other bodily functions. http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=10812

Functional restoration afforded me lessons and insight to be able to push on. Sometimes we already realize these lessons for someone else, but when it’s us, we don’t recognize it the same, we change, unless we change us back.

It’s a daily process to overcome additional challenges brought on by chronic or intractable pain. It’s moment by moment at times. Having to stop something suddenly to practice breathing exercises to decrease a stress situation brought on by either emotion or a spike in pain, bring a rise in blood pressure down, use focal points, imagery or going to my “happy place” in my mind to ease myself.

“I will walk, when I cannot walk I will carry myself, when I cannot carry myself, I will fly” ©2009-2015 Twinkle VanFleet/@rsdcrpsfire Written while attending Compass Center for Functional Restoration

John C. Thomas, PhD, Rick Wurster MSG, MPT, ABP, BCIAC, Leticia Camarena M. A., Tatyana Yatsenko, Larry Lane, Patient, Patient, Twinkle VanFleet, Patient. Compass Center for Functional Restoration Graduation July 17, 2009

I began recording both my P & E. I tracked my “pain” level and my “emotional” level using the same Numeric Rating Scale. The 11 point 0 – 10 scale where 0 represents “no pain” and 10 represents “worse pain imaginable”, “as bad as I can imagine” or unimaginable. I don’t do this anymore because I’ve learned to have the awareness without tracking, but for example at the moment I logged, my E/emotions/stress was an 8 and my P/pain/physical was a 5, I would eventually learn that my pain level would most likely rise anytime. I had to use my cognitive tools right away to reduce my stressors in order to manage the physical pain. I discussed this concept at MDJunction.com when I was a group leader in the RSD Support Forum in 2009.

Life itself can be hard, add pain to it, and it’s even harder. It can be managed with the right tools. It’s never going to be perfect, but we can make it as comfortable or as tolerable as possible for ourselves. Removing or decreasing triggers that instigate pain have eased me. I can’t watch the internet all day. It’s not because I don’t love or care for everyone. It’s because there are pain triggers everywhere. When we see images, graphics, memes of illness or disease scrolling by, especially our own, a trigger can occur. I’ve learned over the years to recognize this. I have the awareness to understand that I can be a contributing factor in my own discomfort.

I never went to preschool and Kindergarten was only for a week or two. I started school in the first grade. I was taught at home and I was reading at advanced levels by the age of 5. My comprehension and spelling ability was always above average. While I either suppressed it or just didn’t care to acknowledge it, I did go to special classes in the first and second grade because I couldn’t pronounce the letter’s S and T in words and sentences properly. I was a critical thinker immediately in life. http://www.criticalthinking.org/pages/defining-critical-thinking/766

By the time I got to my 4th elementary school in the middle of the school year in the second grade, I didn’t have to tell anyone I went to the classes with the special ones. Those new kids and that neighborhood became the ones I grew up with until I left Sacramento in October of the 9th grade to move to L.A. County for my dad’s job. The rest of that year carried with it a bit of insecurity. I started Drama at my new high school and as a Junior I was in second year advanced drama, speech, debate and thespian clubs, involved in school plays, in chamber singers for a while, I swirled the baton too, but chose my priorities and kept to the one’s I still use today. By the middle of the 11th grade I was off to the high desert where my parents bought a home. I’ve been in 4 high schools, 2 Junior high’s due to the district split and several elementary. I learned to adapt young. I may not like it, but I do it fairly well. I’m a survivor of repeated childhood molestation and indirect physical and emotional abuse.

I’ve been an Empath http://themindunleashed.org/2013/10/30-traits-of-empath.html for as long as I can remember. I can vividly still remember leaving my teething ring on the back metal bumper edge of my dad’s best friend’s pickup truck and them driving away with it. I’m hypersensitive to people, places and things sometimes to my own detriment, yet I’m also a no-nonsense girl. I’m inclined to the natural order of things, including man and woman, but I’m not a doormat. I love my crazy and he does, too! Why? Because it’s really not all that crazy, I just like to have it appear so in the midst all the uncertainty in life. Laughing is the best medicine of all. If I can make you laugh, give you something to laugh at even if it’s at my own expense, I’m thrilled to have been of service.”

Empathy Vs Sympathy


Sure there are times I think “Dang, no one gets it!” I don’t mean in everyday situations, I mean in my critical thinking. Those who are on the same page fear agreeing openly until my thought, reasoning, even an educated statement that I make is validated by someone with high education, authority or status. By that time I really don’t need the care, concern or acknowledgment. I might have needed it when I was no one to be acknowledged for. No one will ever know in these situations because I’ll not ever treat them any different and there isn’t any animosity, but there is recall. Why? Because everything we do or don’t do to another person makes an impact on them. Those impacts influence the rest of their lives by accumulation in decisions and choices. This includes my interaction with other people.

By the time I was in the 4th grade I was in the MGM program. At that time called Mentally Gifted Minds. My 9-year-old grandson is currently in the Gifted and Talented Education Program (G.A.T.E.).

During the 4th to 6th grade 2 of my class periods were reserved for tutoring the NES (Non English Speaking) students who just joined our Country from Vietnam, and other Southeast Asian communities. I was 8 years old when I began the 4th grade. These years were 1975-1977/78. Due to being bright enough to be a student teacher at such a young age, I missed normal class subject time; I began to fall behind in math studies. My mathematical education is only that of general knowledge. I held enough that I was promoted to General Manager for a Restaurant by the time I was 24.

I started college when I was 15 in the high desert of California. Law and Acting. I studied both Fundamentals of Crime and Delinquency and Theory and Practice of Acting. I loved being a minor, non-adult, in an adult law class. I loved that my mind was evolving, but it was at a pace others couldn’t keep up with. I loved learning by law enforcement mentors and the few things I participated in to grow and develop lifetime strategies for. I’ve been fond of the Law, Sociology, Philosophy, Theology, Theosophy, The Human Mind, Psychology, Enlightenment, Consciousness. Alternative Lifestyles, Natural Order and the last decade or so Pain Psychology. I like various other topics relating to each of these, too. When I indulge in a book these are the things I enlighten myself in.”  Excerpts from, Overcoming Challenging Obstacles by Twinkle VanFleet (Currently unpublished in its entirety) ©2015 Twinkle VanFleet, Overcoming Challenging Obstacles. All rights reserved.

(Several paragraphs have been removed from the original for this share)


It really is a multi-disciplinary approach to pain care and taking an active role in our own overall well-being that makes the difference between making it or breaking it. Even if we have to fake it to make it to get there.


In Memory of Mary LaBree – An Original RSD Advocate

One of our original RSDS Advocates, Mary LaBree, passed away on October 15, 2015 due to complications from Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD). Mary exemplified commitment to the RSD community for over 3 decades. As the Director of the New England RSDS Coalition since 1990, Mary sought to educate and bring awareness to the public and private sectors for the disease that was virtually unheard of back then. Originally from Leicester, Massachusetts, she was formally educated at Worcester State University in Worcester, Massachusetts.



Mary secured the JULY Proclamation for RSDS To urge all of the citizens of the Commonwealth to take cognizance of this event and participate fittingly in its observance. Given at the Executive Chamber in Boston, the twenty-fourth of June in the year two thousand and eleven, and of the Independence of the United States of America, the two hundred and thirty forth.” Massachusetts Bill # 5938


She worked both locally in Massachusetts and Nationally.


Mary formed and lead seminars, attended others, developed awareness events, distributed information and educational materials. She spoke with patients, caregivers, physicians, hospitals, insurance companies, fellow educators, universities, other peer groups, and those with an interest to learn about Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy. She was involved with grants, research and fundraising.


When Mary LaBree began advocating for RSD in the 1980’s the term Complex Regional Pain Syndrome hadn’t been created. While other names had been used previously to describe Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (Syndrome) it was most often referred to as RSDS.


In 2012, she reached out to me and a friendship formed. We shared phone calls, messages and correspondence by snail mail. Mary sent me a copy of the photo of she and other’s of the original signing of her proclamation and a copy of the verbiage used to secure her proclamations. I’m privileged to know what Mary looks like. For now, I’ll not share those, nor have I ever. She shared with me 30+ years of everything. How she started, how she educated, how other RSD organizations began, her children, grandchildren, colleagues, the strength it takes to endure; not just in living with pain, but being a part of it.


If you pray, why worry…  If you worry, why pray?  


I had plans to meet her in person twice. The first time she had to return home early. I was supposed to meet her again toward the end of October or into mid-November. I had just spoken to her less than a week before her passing.


  • October 8

10/8, 4:04pm

Mary LaBree

I was in the hospital yesterday, I had an accident with my wheelchair when I tried to back it up ( standing in front of it. ) (Stupid me )when I pushed the button to back it up.. I pushed it the wrong way..And ran over my LEDs from the ankles to the knees. I was really blessed when the ER Dr. Asked what other problems did I have, & when I explained CRPS He said oh Chronic Regional Pain Syndrome , I said yes. He treated me with kindness & care. I’m going to send him a thank you card. He was really kind. You don’t always find a kind caring Dr..pls pray for me to recover. I have a lot of CRPS work to do. I will be leaving for CA in a few weeks. Ty.M

  • October 9

10/9, 5:22pm

Twinkle Wood-VanFleet

You’re always in my thoughts and prayers for your health, and your work, Mary. I do hope to meet you in November. xx

  • October 10

10/10, 10:07pm

Mary LaBree

Hi, Yes I’m looking forward to meeting you as well. I leave Oct 23 on. Friday. A lil less then 2 wks.I will call u sometime on the weekend after I arrive, hugs & lots of love.M

  • October 12

10/12, 7:04pm

Mary LaBree

I’m sorry I had a mistake that I didn’t want to have a group pls forgive me, as I pressed the wrong thing, & didn’t realize it until someone told me.


The next message on Oct 12, I missed due to being away and my IM being flooded and then she was gone. I was on the road to and from the Stanford Transplant Clinic for our daughter on the 15th and in the Emergency Department on the 16th due to my cervical spine. Trying to save the puppies life all in between.

The last message was in reference to an accidental group IM.

I had been wondering if she would want to make the plans to meet at the NERVEmber, West Coast Pain Forum for Power of Pain Foundation on November 14th. All I knew for certain is she planned to be here in Northern California on the 23rd of October and would call me.


Mary LaBree Melanie McDowell Awareness and Advocacy Award Nomination 2015 Slide property of @powerofpain

Permission granted and sent from the Power of Pain Foundation to share in Mary’s memory. Melanie McDowell Awareness and Advocacy Award Nomination 2015


I wish she would have received more nominations, but mine was the only one for her.  She was most deserving.


We never know for certain where our conversations go even when we chit-chat on the phone or when we think they are in confidence. I don’t know what Mary ever spoke of me to others, but I know that she must have believed in me enough with what she did share with me to know I would keep it to me and if she didn’t know for sure when she told me she knew as time went on because I’ve never told it.

She asked me sometime in 2013 to consider being trained by her for her Coalition and new endeavors. While I was most honored, I respectfully declined as I was already committed to Power of Pain.

Our conversations also consisted of but weren’t limited to life, color, ethnicity, race, the olden days, differences, equality, change and today. She shared with me uncertainties about people, places and things, and I eased her in certain fear and prejudices. Please don’t misunderstand me, I’m not at all implying Mary was prejudice, in fact, she’s not, though conversations were simply sometimes deep. Mary listened and she learned. She watched, listened to gossip, dismissed it, listened more, read, picked it apart, put it together, and ultimately decided for herself. She wasn’t afraid to speak her mind or share a maybe, what if, what do you think or did you know.


I’m humbled to have been accepted, acknowledged, taught and even loved by her.


Mary was so proud of the New England RSDS Coalition, she was thrilled that the healthcare community was finally beginning to know what RSD (CRPS) is. She was pleased that patients had informational materials to seek out and be provided. She was happy that educational events were provided free to the public.


She told me the story behind July and why her proclamations are for the month of independence and not November. As I stated Mary began educating RSD over 30 years ago. July was chosen for freedom, freedom from pain. It wasn’t until many years later that a national color evolved, and then our month of recognition. Mary was grateful for her closest friends. I know she loved her beautiful friend, advocate and poet, Jane (Gonzales).


I prayed for her health and I prayed for her to achieve her life’s work, her mission to create awareness and educate on RSD, her purpose to continue doing so, and her hope for our future.


You did Mary! You really did! You achieved them all to the last breath.


And I thank you!


With gratitude, hugs and lots of love,


Miss you, won’t forget you,



Mary’s Facebook page:    Pro image ML  https://www.facebook.com/messages/mlabree1




Lets not forget the ones who started the path that gave way for us to do what we do.  ~Twinkle V.


On behalf of all of us this one’s for you!


(Originally written at the end of October and updated today)



Reference to Mary’s favorite quote shared above. The above is shared the way she said it.


“If You Pray Don’t Worry… If You Worry Why Pray” sermon by Levi Wright


Making Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Simple For a Jury


A start-to-finish strategy for proving the chronic pain and resultant damages of CRPS

When God was testing the faith of Job, the worst punishment was physical pain…. He lost his lands and property, his family – but it was not until physical pain was inflicted that Job broke. (Job 16:6).

A case dealing with chronic pain can be difficult to prove due to the subjective nature of pain itself. This is especially true for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome cases (“CRPS”). CRPS, formerly known as Reflex Sympathetic Distrophy Syndrome (“RSD”), is an incurable chronic pain condition that is often debilitating. For trial lawyers and their clients, this disorder is especially troubling because of the controversy surrounding its diagnosis and treatment. As its very name implies, the disorder is “complex” in nature, is routinely misdiagnosed, and as such, is difficult to explain and prove to a jury.

Take a recent case that had a mixed diagnosis: Some doctors thought it was CRPS, while some did not. In the end, what mattered was our client had severe pain that would likely afflict him for the rest of his life. This was something the jury understood, whether we called it CRPS or not. The primary purpose of this article is to explain the basics of CRPS, highlight some of the challenges in dealing with a CRPS case, and discuss some useful strategies from a recent trial.


CRPS is a chronic pain condition most often affecting one of the limbs (arms, legs, hands, or feet), in which the pain is out of proportion to thc injury. There are two designations of CRPS: Type I and II. Typc I, which this article will focus on, is a result of trauma. Type II stems from a specific injury to a nerve.

Some researchers have said CRPS is potentially the worst chronic pain disorder a human being could endure. Doctors describe the severe cases of CRPS as being higher on the pain scale than childbirth and amputation. However, over the years, pain management practitioners were overzealous in diagnosing chronic pain patients with CRPS. In the early 1990s, “RSD” cases were popping up everywhere, perhaps in part due to the unclear diagnostic criteria at the time. Now, after the hype has calmed and thorough research has flushed out a more clear understanding of the disorder, CRPS cases can and should command the same attention as other severe injuries such as brain and spinal cord injuries.

To begin with, CRPS arises typically after an injury or trauma to the affected limb. For example, a seemingly simple fracture to the ankle eventually causing a severe pain disorder in that limb. The most frightening aspect of the disease is that it often initially begins in an arm or a leg and often spreads throughout the body. In fact, according to the National Institute of Health, 92 percent of patients state that they have experienced a spread, and 35 percent of patients report symptoms in their whole body.

CRPS is characterized by prolonged or excessive pain and mild or dramatic changes in skin color, temperature, and/or swelling in the affected area. These signs can be subtle in nature, or dramatic, depending on the severity of the CRPS.

CRPS symptoms vary in severity and duration. The key symptom is prolonged pain that may be constant and, in some people, extremely uncomfortable or severe. The pain may feel like a burning or “pins and needles” sensation, or as if someone is squeezing the affected limb. The pain may spread to include the entire arm or leg, even though the precipitating injury might have been only to a finger or toe. Pain can sometimes even travel to the opposite extremity. There is often increased sensitivity in the affected area, such that even light touch or contact is painful (called allodynia).

People with CRPS also experience constant or intermittent changes in temperature, skin color, and swelling of the affected limb. An affected arm or leg may feel warmer or cooler compared to the opposite limb. The skin on the affected limb may change color, becoming blotchy, blue, purple, pale, or red. As discussed in more detail below, due to the complexity of the disorder, CRPS cases are often overlooked, misdiagnosed, and not properly worked up.


As trial lawyers, we appreciate that many of our clients do not have the type of medical treatment and insurance required to get a complete medical workup and diagnosis. Often, an injury like a brain bleed or spinal fracture might go misdiagnosed. With a disorder such as CRPS, this is truly one of the injuries that often require an attorney’s eye and attention to appreciate the client’s dilemma.

The following are a few points to consider when interviewing a client to determine if he or she potentially has CRPS:

• An injury causing pain which is out of proportion to injury,

• Changes in skin texture on the affected area; it may appear shiny and thin,

• Abnormal sweating pattern in the affected area or surrounding areas,

• Changes in nail and hair growth patterns,

• Stiffness in affected joints,

• Problems coordinating muscle movement, with decreased ability to move the affected body part, and,

• Abnormal movement in the affected limb (most often fixed abnormal posture, or tremors of the affected limb).

For a full CRPS potential case checklist, please contact the author.

Find out more about:

What Causes CRPS?

CRPS Diagnosis and Prognosis

How to Deal with Conflicting CRPS Diagnoses

Voir Dire Tips in a Pain Trial

Experts: Get the Dream Team

Dealing with the Defense “Expert”

Making it Simple

via Making Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Simple For a Jury.



Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: The Relentless Pursuit of Justice



Diagnosis and Risk Factors

Prognosis and Treatment

Lawsuits and Damages

Spencer Lucas is a trial lawyer at Panish Shea & Boyle and specializes in complex catastrophic personal injury, products liability and wrongful death cases.  He has extensive experience in cases involving traumatic brain injuries, spinal cord injuries, and chronic pain.

Panish Shea & Boyle, LLP

11111 Santa Monica Blvd #700, Los Angeles, CA 90025

PHONE 877.800.1700

FAX 310.477.1699

Spinal Modulation Completes Enrollment of Its Landmark U.S. Pivotal Trial Evaluating the Axium Neurostimulator System for Chronic Pain | Business Wire

The ACCURATE study enrolled 152 patients at 22 centers throughout the United States. This represents the largest neuromodulation study to be conducted in patients suffering from nerve injuries (peripheral causalgia) or complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS, also known as RSD) to date.

“Approximately 10-50% of patients who undergo common procedures like hernia repair, knee surgery, and other lower limb surgeries will suffer from chronic pain resulting from nerve injury2. These conditions have historically been difficult to treat with currently available technology,” said Dr. Timothy Deer, co-study lead and CEO and President of the Center for Pain Relief in Charleston, West Virginia. “The ACCURATE trial is a landmark study that could change the way we treat these chronic pain conditions. Results from prior European studies have been promising, and we are hopeful that the ACCURATE trial will continue to substantiate the effectiveness of this therapy for our patients.”

Read more-

via Spinal Modulation Completes Enrollment of Its Landmark U.S. Pivotal Trial Evaluating the Axium Neurostimulator System for Chronic Pain | Business Wire.

Vaca woman continues to advocate for those with painful nerve condition

Pain Awareness Month 2014

Read Jo Hewitt’s story here


She also founded the Jingle Bell Benefit Run/Walk to Candy Cane Lane two years ago to benefit RSD and raise awareness by doing an annual event.

This years event will be held on December 11, 2014. Find Jo on Facebook for more information and to see how you can help.


Pain Awareness Month 2014

Help Sara move forward in her life by considering to support her medical treatment fund. Sara, like many of us has CRPS/RSD and is trying hard to work toward her dreams.


Author Donna Nefferdorf Releases “To Know Him Is To Love Him”

– A Real Story of Healing With the Help of the Creator

ToKnowHimIsToLoveHimCover. DonnaPhysical, emotional and spiritual challenges can be part of life.  Author Donna Nefferdorf has faced them all and tells how she has been able to overcome these challenges with the help of the Great Physician in her new book “To Know Him Is To Love Him.”


The early response from readers to this heart-felt tale of faith has been remarkable.


July 12, 2014


No one can honestly deny the world is filled with suffering; physical illness, disease, and mental scars that have carried on for generations.  Is there a way to heal?  And is it open to each and every person, if they open up to be healed?  This compelling subject is addressed, by author and minister Donna Nefferdorf in her recently released book “To Know Him Is To Love Him” that tells her real-life story of facing these kinds of issues and overcoming them, with the help of her faith and the Creator.  Readers are reacting to the honesty and delivery of this message of hope, with enthusiasm.


“I really believe my book offers true hope and healing,” commented Nefferdorf.  “To Know Him Is To Love Him, reveals the ‘power of God’s love’ to help anyone overcome their own life challenges.  I’ve experienced this power of healing myself, and it’s a blessing to be able to share this experience with my readers.”


The book was published by Advanced Global Publishing in Shippensburg, PA, on June 27th, 2014.  It’s currently available across multiple formats including as a paperback through Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com and as an ebook from Ingram.


According to Advanced Global Publishing their goal of publishing the book, as well as all of their publishing projects is, “Sharing the love of God one heart at a time to advance the Kingdom of God on earth”.  It’s very clear that “To Know Him Is To Love Him” is a book that embodies that goal, an effort to show the power of the divine to heal everyday problems and bring happiness and fulfillment.  Nefferdorf eloquently helps readers boost their confidence, self-image, courage, and compassion as they come to see in life they are never alone while battling serious health problems, even life threatening ones, or  in better times when they enjoy abundant life as the Creator intended.


Nefferdorf is a minister with Global New Beginnings, which aims to lead others to a “new beginning” with the Father, through a personal relationship with Jesus Christ.


According to early reviews, this new book should go a long way towards inspiring others to explore this relationship.


Evangelist Janice Hollan, recently said, “This book is my friend’s new release and God blessed me to endorse it! I would encourage all to read it! You will find hope, healing, and encouragement in your own life through the testimony of her storms!”


For more information be sure to visit http://www.globalnewbeginnings.com.


Donna is an RSDS Survivor and her story will tell you how. ~T